Music Within Fictional Books

Music to Die For” was a panel at Morecambe and Vice, showcasing some authors and their use of music within their writing as well as their music backgrounds.

William Shaw

William Shaw who had been a music journalist for 20 years and is now a best-selling author. He has received plaudits from well-written, well-known authors such as Val McDermid and Peter May for his book The Birdwatcher and now he has written his latest book is Salt Lake. The first in a new series of books. 

D.S Alexandra Cupidi is his main character who has left the London Met for the Kent Coastline with a  resentful teenager in tow. There a drowned man is found in a slurry pit and the more D.S Cupidi finds, the more questions she has to ask and the more she asks, the more suspicious people grow.

The man drowned in the slurry pit had been herded there like an animal. He was North African, like many of the fruit pickers that work the fields. The more Cupidi discovers, the more she wants to ask – but these people are suspicious of questions.

William Shaw also received the “Eric Award” for services to the Morecambe and Vice Festival.

Salt Lane book

 

Alan Parks

Alan Parks writes what is termed as “Tartan Noir” with his book: Bloody January. He was a successful music industry executive, working with All Saints, New Order, Gnarl’s Barkley and Cee-Lo Green to name but a few.
He talked about how he was inspired by music and how it essentially navigated him through culture. He uses 70s music such as Small Faces and David Bowie. He set his book in 1970’s Glasgow, which is worth mentioning that he sees Glasgow during this time period, being more glam than L.A. with folk making a real effort and getting dressed up for the night. He said, it was a different side of the city, away from the violence that was going on at that time.

Bloody January is a debut novel by Alan Parks and has already been shortlisted for THE GRAND PRIX DE LITTÉRATURE POLICIÈRE.
In Bloody January, Detective Harry McCoy is the main character who investigates the dark underbelly of 70s Glasgow. It is hotly tipped to be a real contender as being a new voice in Tartan-Noir.

 

Bloody January

Joe Thomas

Joe Thomas is a visiting lecturer at Royal Holloway University of London and is the author of Paradise City. He said that he sees music as categories that is infused into his first novel, “Paradise City”, which is set in Sao Paolo. Those categories are: political, joy and melancholy.

Paradise City investigates the underbelly of deepest, darkest Sao, Paulo, Brazil, where there are drugs and guns. Mario Leme is the main character to feature here. He is a low-ranking detective in the Sao Paolo civil police. Every day on the way to work he sets off early and drives through the favela known as Paraisópolis – Paradise City – the place where his wife was gunned down.
There are plaudits for its freshness.

Paradise City book

More About The Music

They talked about how they use music to draw the audience into the character’s worlds, giving them a sense of place and how it adds a certain amount of background atmosphere.

This, I found particularly interesting because music has often cropped up in books, but, certainly in the books I have read in recent times, it has had a presence in a way that seems more than ever before. This I think, can help add to the atmosphere and gives readers a sense of what was going on culturally at a certain time, in a certain place. Today, with the internet, music platforms and tv programmes dedicated to music, it is easier than ever before to look up a song or instrumental piece that is mentioned in a book and actually listen to it, if it is unfamiliar to the reader.

This was an interesting panel of people and the topic of their conversation certainly grabbed my attention and was well done.

All these books can be found within several bookshops such as WH Smith and Waterstones, to name but a few and Amazon.

 

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Music Within Fictional Books

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s