The Chalet by Catherine Cooper @catherinecooper @HarperCollinsUK #Thriller

The Chalet
By Catherine Cooper
Rated: 4 stars ****

The Chalet by Catherine Cooper is delightfully done with an exquisite landscape, but with an underlying darkness full of secrets. I bought this after eyeing it up for quite some time. It was worth taking a chance on and I thought I would write a review on this Sunday TImes Bestseller.

Follow through to find out more below, including my review.

About the Author

Catherine Cooper is a journalist specialising in travel, hotels and skiing, who writes regularly for the Telegraph and the Guardian amongst others. She lives near the Pyrenees in the South of France with her husband and two teenage children, and is a keen skier. The Chalet is her debut novel.

The Chalet

Blurb

The Sunday Times Top 5 bestseller

Four friends. One luxury getaway. The perfect murder.

French Alps, 1998

Two young men ski into a blizzard… but only one returns.

20 years later

Four people connected to the missing man find themselves in that same resort. Each has a secret. Two may have blood on their hands. One is a killer-in-waiting.

Someone knows what really happened that day.

And somebody will pay.

An exciting new debut for anyone who loves Ruth Ware, Lucy Foley, and C.L. Taylor

Review

The Chalet, published late 2020, actually takes place in December 1998, La Madiere, France and has an exquisite cover that is most divine and says so much about the world readers will enter into.

The atmosphere between the characters is that of which picques interest. One who is a visitor and feels entitled and the other who lives there, on the ski resort. This sets the scene for time moving onto January 2020. The Chalet sounds lucious and a place for decadence with champagne flowing and being quaffed. Readers meet Ria, Millie, Hugo and Matt amongst other characters, and it is the perfect wintry read as the Chalet has a roaring fire going. Don’t get too cosy though as there are secrets to be revealed and important newspaper cuttings to be found. The murder and use of interviews and newspaper cuttings cut through the cosyness of this elite group of people quite well.

There are many characters, but they are skillfully handled, so readers won’t get so confused, one a bit later on, is, Louisa, formally, Louise (that’s what her Oxford education has done for her). The pretentiousness within some of the characters, suits the style of the book perfectly.
On one hand it is an exquisite look at how the other half lives and on the other, shows that certain mannerisms go across all “classes” of people. On another it is a twisty murder mystery.
There are many interesting observations within the book, which adds depth and lets readers get under the skin a little and also into their “world” in a chalet to die for!

Things become even more mysterious in part 3 and there is a very good twist at the end.

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