#BookReview By Lou Three’s A Crowd By S.R. Booker @simonbooker @TeamBATC @simonschusterUK #ThreesACrowd #BlogTour

Three’s A Crowd
By S.R. Booker

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Three’s A Crowd is laugh out loud funny, not a phrase I use often and it may just be one of the rom-coms of the year! A phrase I don’t use lightly. It’s absolutely wonderfully entertaining from start to finish. It will make your heart sing with joy. Find out more in the blurb and the rest of my review below…
I first thank The publisher Simon and Schuster for the opportunity to review on the blog tour and for gifting a copy of the book.

Blurb

What happens when an estranged father and son unwittingly fall in love with the same woman? 


Out-of-work actor Harriet is recuperating from a crash-and-burn affair with Damian – aka ‘Cockweasel’ – and making ends meet as a barista when she meets two rather lovely men. Tom is a regular at the café, and seems like such a nice guy. Smooth-talking DJ Richard is older, but in great shape – a real silver fox.

Deciding to take a chance on both of them, Harriet doesn’t realise at first that she is actually dating father and son. Tom and Richard aren’t on speaking terms, and don’t share a last name – so how was she to know? By the time everyone finds out, both Tom and Richard are truly madly deeply in love with Harriet, and she’s faced with an impossible choice.

But as the battle for her affections intensifies, ‘Cockweasel’ makes an unexpected reappearance and begs her to give him another chance…

Review

Set in London, Three’s A Crowd is absolutely divine to read with such sublime writing.

Tom, Richard and Harriet are the main characters, with George popping in. The opening chapter has Tom posing a question. One that no doubt not many people would have even the slightest reason to consider. It certainly isn’t your usual every day one and as he ponders it, so does the reader, because suddenly it has to be done, even with slightly raised eyebrows at the audacity of what is going on…

There are 2 main guys and 1 woman and romance to be had…
Hilarious and also tender scenarios play out in an ordinary sounding cafe, but with an unusual set of circumstances, beginning with the question posed on the first page…
The sentence structures and the way the narrative is written also adds to the humour and also the honesty of certain situations, perhaps observed or perhaps researched. Either way, it is very enjoyable.

Tom is the son and he is not on speaking terms with his dad and is a cafe regular.
Harriet has had a few boyfriend issues and has terrific nicknames for them. works in a cafe and knows her regulars and is a professional actress. One who happens to have intrusive thoughts. She thinks with great honesty about how she is feeling, now, I don’t mean always of the dark nature, some are of the more romantic nature, just incredibly direct. There is absolutely no filter, no subtleness.
Richard, Tom’s dad has secrets about his wife going to Goa. He is also a radio DJ who reckons he should be in a higher position such as being on BBC Radio 2.

Harriet meets both Tom and Richard and hasn’t got a clue they belong to the same family and the two guys also haven’t a clue of the other one falling in love with her because they don’t communicate to each other.

There is so much that people will relate to in either part or all, right down to how men operate, allowing their partner/wife to book appointments etc. S.R. Booker, bravely, is so candid.

The plot is refreshing with incredibly funny with many laugh out loud moments. For an author who is more known for grittier, darker work in books and on tv, S.R. Booker has really pulled this work of contemporary romance with aplomb!

I did find myself rooting for Harriet and her complex mind, which Booksr portrays very well, but also very much enjoying the writing of Richard and Tom. George also pops into the book, adding a twist. There is a further one at the end, making it an excellent ending to such a great book.

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