#Review By Lou #ChildrensBook -The King Who Didn’t Like Snow By Jocelyn Porter Illustrated By Michael S. Kane #JocelynPorter #MichaelSKane #Snow #Christmas

The King Who Didn’t Like Snow
By Jocelyn Porter
Illustrated By Michael S. Kane

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

The King Who Didn’t Like Snow is dedicated to Hospital Radio Volunteers in Plymouth and is a picture book, suitable for 0-6 year olds. Thanks for gifting it to me to review. Check out the blurb and my review below…

The King Who Didn't Like Snow

Blurb

King Mark is a higgledy-piggledy king who gets into a pickle every day. “Do something, Bert!” he shouts, and Wizard Bert, with his sidekick, Broderick the bookworm, always saves the day.
When snow falls on Windy Hill Castle, everyone is delighted – except for King Mark! King Mark doesn’t like snow and starts to sulk.
Will Bert and Broderick save the day again? Will King Mark walk into trouble? Do the children of Windy Hill Village have the answer…?
The King Who Didn’t Like Snow is a magical, amusing tale from the imagination of children’s author Jocelyn Porter. The unique illustrations are provided by none other than Michael S Kane, AKA Shaky Kane, the legendary comic artist.

Review

The book is bright and bold in its illustrations and easy to follow. Unusually, the text is also not only pretty big, it’s in bold, making it easy for a story-time curled up together or for children to read by themselves too, when they reach that stage.

The story takes place in a magical land called – Cornovia, where a time-travelling wizard (Bertram Ebenezer Rufus Togtangle) lives with Broderick – a bookworm in a Windy Hill Castle.

There are spells to be cast and a gigantic library, where Broderick goes to and almost forgotten games to discover.

When it snows, King Mark is not a happy man and is rather grumpy about it. The bookworm has and the wizard have an idea to create some fun and change the snow to a different colour.

There’s trying different things, such as toboganning down a hill. There’s also a message of being careful for what you wish for.

The book has some humour in it and also shows libraries off really nicely and in a fun way as well as winter fun, just in time for wintry weather.

#Review By Lou of Adventures on Trains – Danger At Deadman’s Pass By M. G. Leonard and Sam Sedgman for 9 years to 11 years @MGLnrd @samuelsedgman @MacmillanKidsUK #MiddleGrade #ChildrensBooks #AdventuresOnTrains

Danger At Deadman’s Pass
By M. G. Leonard and Sam Sedgman

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Danger at Dead Man's Pass, M. G. Leonard , Sam Sedgman, Macmillan Children's Books, Elisa Paganelli

A high speed train journey of a series, this is book 4. Check out the blurb and my review as well as other praise from prominent and famous children’s authors and press. This book is great for 9 year olds to 11 year olds.

Danger At Deadmans Pass Cover

Blurb

Embark on a thrilling fourth adventure in the bestselling, prize-winning Adventures on Trains series – Danger at Dead Man’s Pass, from M. G. Leonard and Sam Sedgman, as Harrison Beck investigates an ancient family curse high in the German mountains. Illustrated in black-and-white throughout by Elisa Paganelli.


A mysterious letter from an old friend asks Hal and Uncle Nat to help investigate a spooky supernatural mystery. Legend has it the Kratzensteins, a family of rich and powerful railway tycoons, are cursed, but there is no such thing as a curse, is there . . .?

Hal and Nat take the night train to Berlin and go undercover. From a creaking spooky old house at the foot of the Harz mountains, they take the Kratzenstein family’s funeral train to the peak of the Brocken Mountain. Can Hal uncover the secrets of the Brocken railway and the family curse before disaster strikes?

Review

Danger at Dead Man's Pass, M. G. Leonard , Sam Sedgman, Macmillan Children's Books, Elisa PaganelliAll Aboard For Your Journey To Germany! It Will Be An Unexpected Journey Of A Life Time!

Firstly, that exciting cover is totally attention grabbing. There is much to enthrall within the book too. It is packed full of characters and mysterious things going on, including a curse. The mysteries don’t stop there, with such sensational intrigue at a creaky house, that has just the right amount of spookiness, with its private train line. The thought of a private line to a rather unusual large house is sure to capture children’s imaginations and thrill them. It’s just so cool!

Danger at Dead Man's Pass, M. G. Leonard , Sam Sedgman, Macmillan Children's Books, Elisa PaganelliThere’s lots to unravel within the book that will entertain 9 years to 11 year old children, which it is pitched at perfectly for.
There’s a family which is out of the ordinary – the Kratzensteins to get to know, including working out their curse, which sends readers on a thrilling action-packed mystery to get their teeth into and solve.

Reach the end of your journey and find some facts about where you’ve been.
So, I highly recommend this thrilling train journey that chuffs on with speed and much excitement that will get the adrenaline pumping so much, children will be so curious as to how it can all possibly end and then want some more!

Danger at Dead Man's Pass, M. G. Leonard , Sam Sedgman, Macmillan Children's Books, Elisa Paganelli

#BookReview By Lou Sticky Icky Vicky – Courage Over Fear By Alysia & Michael Ssentamu, Illustrated By Noor Alshalbi #StickyIckyVicky #PixelPublishingHouse #AlysiaSsentamu #MichaelSsentamu #OvercomingFear #6to10yearsReading #ChildrensBook #Parenting #Families

Sticky Icky Vicky – Courage Over Fear
By Alysia & Michael Ssentamu
Illustrated By Noor Alshalbi

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Readers meet Sticky Icky Vicky in what is an ultimately positive rhyming story about overcoming fears. A book suitable for 6 to 10 year olds.
Thanks to Pixel Publishing House for gifting me the copy for review. Find out more in the blurb and review below.

Sticky Icky Vicky

Blurb

Meet Sticky Icky Vicky, a girl who wants to get over her fear—once and for all

In Courage over Fear, the first book in the Sticky Icky Vicky™ series, authors Alysia and Michael Ssentamu introduce readers to Vicky, a fun-loving girl who doesn’t mind getting a little sticky and icky. She loves rolling down hills and playing in mud—but when it comes to water, Sticky Icky Vicky’s fear prevents her from joining in the fun. Then Vicky gets an invitation for a waterpark party, and she decides that she really wants to go—even if it means ignoring the Negative Ned voice in her head and getting over her fear.

With vibrant illustrations and catchy rhymes, Courage over Fear offers children an inspirational/loveable heroine who learns some valuable life lessons, such as:

● Courage                ● Positive thinking                  ● Goal-setting

Aimed primarily at readers aged six to ten, Sticky Icky Vicky: Courage over Fear is a reading experience that leaves kids believing that they, like Vicky, can get past any obstacle in their way.

Review

The book is rhyming, which makes it great for using for 6 to 10 year olds. It’s enjoyable for this age group and is a positive story that is conveyed well for this age group. The fact it rhymes makes the fear less daunting in a way and makes it seem more palatable to read as it is less heavy than it may have been otherwise, especially for the younger part of this age group. For the whole age group, the book can be used as a discussion opener with children who have similar issues to Vicky surrounding water.

The story starts with Vicky having fun with friends, but soon it is revealed that she has a fear of water, the reason being explained within the story. This then begins to have an impact on her life, especially, in this instance, her social life as her instinct is to decline an invite to a water park. Instead of doing this, she decides to be brave and confront her fear and the thoughts in her head, which materialise as “Negative Ned”. There are however more positive thoughts, which materialise as “Positive Ted” to combat the negativity.

The book can help children see that something is worth a try, even though they are fearful at first because it could be more fun than they first imagined. So, it could be used as a tool to help widen children’s interests and their world and build courage and resilience.

#BookReview By Lou The Wild Before By Piers Torday @PiersTorday @QuercusKids #MiddleGrade #NaturalWorld #ClimateStory #ChildrensBook

The Wild Before
By Piers Torday

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

The Wild Before is a great story that encompasses animals in the natural world and the climate. It is suitable for older middle-grade readers.
Thanks to Quercus Kids publisher for gifting me the book to review. Discover more in the blurb and rest of my review below and the eye-catching cover.

The Wild Before cover

Blurb

Can one hare alone change the world? The captivating animal adventure destined to be loved by readers of all ages. A stunning hardback edition from the bestselling, much-loved author, Piers Torday.

One stormy, snowy night, a pure silver calf is born on an ordinary muddy farm by the light of the moon. This is the legendary Mooncalf, whose arrival has been foretold since the dawn of time.

According to a dream passed down from animal to animal, if the calf dies, a great Terribleness will come – rising seas, a plague, skies raining down fire, the end of all things… and Little Hare vows to persuade all the animals to protect Mooncalf, whatever the cost.

But it’s easier said than done, and soon Little Hare realises that he is the only one who can save the world…

A stunning prequel to the award-winning, bestselling The Last Wild trilogy, touching on timely themes of climate change, friendship, and above all, hope.
‘Piers Torday is the new master of books for children’ The Times

Review

The Wild Before coverThe Wild Before starts off illustrating different sorts of moon for the whole year. A different name per month. There’s also a glossary so children can totally understand the animals.

Readers get to know Little Hare first, who runs ever so fast to find where Dandelion Hill was. From the start you can tell there is something not right. Little Hare is on a mission to find the wild and to pass on an urgent message. Wildeness is in charge, but he encounters wolves who claim to be guardians of Wildeness in the north…. The book then goes onto the first chapter and beyond. It’s absolutely beautifully written and captivating by the tension created and trepidation. In an instant you care about Little Hare and what she has to say and hope he survives. There is also Bite-Hare, Sist-Hare and Run-Hare.
The book is cute in its storytelling and in its illustrations, but also shows some of the hardships that wildlife has. There are also dogs and humans to fear and to watch out for as the hares try to leave the farm they are on to go to try and travel northwards to get to speak with Wildeness. They also comes across Brock who is a badger and a harvest mouse, who has lots of songs. The mission also means trying to find a specific flower and that may require a human as the race is on to stop a virus.

The book highlights climate change and the sea levels rising and the hardships humans and animals have. The book also shows the natural world in action in all its magnificence and also the life and death within it and that concern animals have that their prey may capture them that day. The book also shows heirarchy in animals and Wildeness being at the top.

The Wild Before is like today’s Animal’s of Farthing Wood and Watership Down. It fits very well with these books in its themes and desire to read about the natural world and to care about it. It may be an emotional read for children, but one that they’ll find compelling to say the least.
It has, amongst the adventure and all the dangers, an important message to convey to readers too.
Classes in schools are already reading this. There’s much to read and discuss, but in saying that, it can also be read for pleasure at home too as middle grade readers will like being swept up in the storytelling and the adventure of it all.

#BookReview By Lou – The Dragon With The Blazing Bottom @simonkids_UK #Beach #PictureBook #Preschool #KS1 #ChildrensBook #KidsBook

The Dragon With The Blazing Bottom
By Beach

Rating: 5 out of 5.

There’s plenty of humour for children in The Dragon With The Blazing Bottom. Thanks to Simon and Schuster Kids for gifting me this book to review.
Please find out more in the blurb and my review below.

The Dragon With The Blazing Bottom cover

Blurb

The first in a fabulously funny and hugely commercial series about a dragon who has lost his flame – but may just find fire elsewhere . . . Perfect for fans of The DInosaur That Pooped series.

Sir Wayne’s dragon has lost his flame. Are his teeth TOO clean? Is his tongue TOO pink? Perhaps his diet is to blame. Not to worry – Sir Wayne has a meal plan of EPIC proportions, including a big lump of lava, one burning bush, some sparklers and fireworks – the ones that go ‘WHOOOOSH’. Oh, and one VERY mouldy old piece of cheese – almost as green as the snot from a sneeze . . . What could possibly go wrong?!
A hilarious and dynamic character-driven picture book, with a truly explosive ending! From the hugely exciting new picture book talent, Beach.

Review

The Dragon With The Blazing Bottom absolutely would appeal to children’s sense of humour in its rhyming tale. This is a great debut picture book by Beach. It hits all the right notes for pre-school to 5 year olds.
There are 2 great characters to meet – a knight – Sir Wayne and a huge, bright red dragon who can’t breathe fire. The knight assists the dragon and the illustrations just add to the fun of this as many ways are tried.
Young children are sure to have fun as they discover what happens to the dragon.
It’ll absolutely appeal to children with that “toilet” sense of humour and those who like dragons, knights and dinosaurs, like the one who pooped… It’s sure to gross them out in a way that will have them laugh lots.
It’s a book that is great for bringing some humour into your child’s life and one that adults can have fun with when reading it to their child(ren).

#Review by Lou – Art – Small Great Gestures By Francisco Llorca and Isabel Albertos #FranciscoLlorca #IsabelAlbertos @AllisonandBusby #ChildrensNonFiction #ChildrensBook

Art – Small Great Gestures
By Francisco Llorca and Isabel Albertos

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Art is a lovely introduction to art and artists through the ages that would sit well in the classroom and at home. Find out more in the blurb and review below.
First, thanks to publisher – Allison & Busby for gifting me the book to review.

Art

Blurb

For those who loved Little People, BIG DREAMS, this new series showcases the lives and achievements of amazing men and women.

 From the Renaissance to the present day, this inspiring book paints a vivid picture of the lives and works of eleven artists who stood out from the crowd and changed how we see the world.

 Beginning with Giotto in Renaissance Florence and ending with Banksy’s international street art, including Picasso in the Spanish Civil War and Frida Kahlo in 1920s Mexico, Art is a beautiful and entertaining book for budding artists everywhere.

Review

This is a lovely book that essentially provides an introduction to art. It takes young readers into the worlds of Giotto, Goya, Duchamp, Picasso, Warhol, Banksy and a few more besides. It gives a glimpse into the eras they lived in and what they are famous for and their painting styles. The book does this with a short paragrapgh and an illustration, with each artist taking up just a page each. Further interest can be found in photographs and self-portraits of the featured artists, so readers can see what they really looked like, which is quite respectful. There are also dates of their births and deaths to be found there. Of course certain artists are shown by their artwork instead, such as the elusive Banksy, so anyone hoping for a picture of what this graffiti artist looks like would be disappointed, but I am sure, not surprised.

This book is good for the home and for in classrooms as a tool into the introductory of art through the ages. It would sit well amongst other books of this nature as this showcases just a few artists, but perhaps some less “obvious” ones that are often chosen for this sort of book and not all ones that would instantly spring to children’s minds, so their knowledge in this way can be expanded further.