#BookReview of – Undying Book 1 – The Kinship of DJinns and Book 2 – My Uncle’s Son By  Ambreen Hameed and Uzma Hameed @AmbreenHameed1 #UmzaHameed

Undying Book 1 – The Kinship of DJinns and Book 2 – My Uncle’s Son
By Ambreen Hameed and Uzma Hameed

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

A romance that puts traditions and modern ways of living at juxtopositions to create the tensions, wrapped around a volatile political landscape. The book shows inner lives of two sisters and there’s a touch of magic intertwined in there too. Pretty good for a debut and the books are better than I thought they were going to be.
Take a look at the blurbs in both books and then my review.
Thanks to Uzma Hameed for asking me to review their books via the Contact option on my blog.

Undying Duo pic

Blurb – Book 1

UNDYING Book 1: The Kinship of Djinns“Sibling rivalry, evolutionary science, theatre, film and even magic all have a part to play in Ambreen and Uzma Hameed’s exuberant tale of a romantic triangle… UNDYING is huge fun. Its sitcom style comedy and affectionate satire deepen into a mystery that explores what unites and divides us, in families and communities, and asks how art, science and religion try to make sense of a violent and unjust world.” Boyd Tonkin, Former Chair of Judges, Man Booker International Prize

It is 1998 and the leader of the free world is under fire after an affair with a young intern. Meanwhile, in a corner of South London, the Malik sisters have also committed a sin: they are in their thirties and still not married. Now the unexpected return of their childhood playmate spells the chance of a happy ending: but only for one of them. And this time, younger sister Zarina is determined she won’t be second in line to Sufya, the eldest – even if it means resorting to dubious occult practices. But as tensions rise across the Muslim world, sibling rivalry and Sufi spells are not the only forces with which the three lovers must contend.

Blurb – Book 2

UNDYING Book 2: My Uncle's SonChristmas 1998 approaches and the Malik sisters struggle to come to terms with Heathrow’s disappearance. A series of unanswered questions leads Sufya on a journey across the Holy Land. Back in South London, Zarina believes she is receiving messages from beyond the grave. As the leader of the free world sends bombs down on Baghdad, anger boils over in the Muslim community. The family falls under suspicion and both sisters must pick a side.

My Uncle’s Son is the thrilling conclusion to UNDYING.

Review

The books are best read when they are read sequentially. Both books are predominently about Sufya and Zarina and their lives in 1998. They are modern Muslims who are just trying to get on with their lives. The sisters have, according to their religion, committed a sin by still not being married and it is more than frowned upon as they are in their thirties. There is also the question of career/interest choice as Sufya is into scientific writing, which seems more palatable than Zarina and her interest in theatre. The book deals with the differences in attitudes between younger Muslim’s and those with more traditional views. This sort of tension creates interest and shows some of the almost juxtopositions that traditonal and modern generations sit at. There is also, however the ties that bind them together. It’s a pretty intense read, that can at times be gripping and is mostly a good read.

This is a love story that rails against traditional Muslim values. There is also some humour, but it isn’t without its darkness that looms as it doesn’t only show the moderate, but also some of the extremes too with the backdrop of some beautiful scenery.
There are also the political attitudes of the time to the affair of Clinton and Lewinsky, war, suicide bombers that are touched upon.

The title of the second book – My Uncle’s Son is the concluding part of this story. You can’t read one without the other if you want to know the ending. The title – My Uncle’s Son is the title of a film as many potential cast assemble, as this book is a bit more about the arts industry, which book 1 touches upon.

There’s a character – Heathrow, or H, who goes missing. This is a character that runs through both books. The book examines and questions how you’d feel if someone you knew wore explosives. 

Both books, intriguingly (and sometimes this works better than other times), looks at genetics in primates and humans. It offers up some thought-provoking points, especially at the parts where this doesn’t get readers too bogged down. It is an intriguing and certainly different way that the characters, mostly Sufya and Zarina, try to understand what is happening in the world as they try to make sense of it all and the enormity of the violence that is harbouring in some people.

The themes of the first book link up well in the second book, tying them both together, which I thought was good and keeps Zarina and Sufya headstrong about their views on marriage, including arranged marriage.

The book also questions whether love can conquer all, even when all around can be so brutal and relationships can be tough as can finding your own way of life, that may go against a traditional grain. It is this, going against the grain that perhaps shows change and how there are modern Muslims living life their own way and makes Zarina and Sufya’s characters most interesting and wills you on in the hope they succeed.

The second book is a very good conclusion to this duo of books that has passion, anger, violence and love throughout.

#BookReview by Lou of Frontline By Dr. Hilary Jones @DrHilaryJones @welbeckpublish #WorldWar1 #HistoricalFiction #SpanishFlu #Frontline #GeneralFiction

Frontline
By Dr. Hilary Jones

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Frontline takes those at war in the First World War and in the medical profession and creates an intensely emotional, knowledgeable book that expertly weaves fact and fiction together to create a tight-knit story, very apt for our times. From the cover to the end of the story, it is intensely poignant in many ways.
Discover more in the blurb and the rest of my review and where you can buy Frontline.
I thank Welbeck Books for gifting me a copy of the book, in exchange for an honest review.

Frontline cover

Blurb

The doctor hits the spot and deserves to be read’

JEFFREY ARCHER

A SWEEPING DRAMA SET ON THE BATTLEFIELDS OF EUROPE AS A GLOBAL INFLUENZA PANDEMIC LOOMS . . .

Frontline is the first book in a series charting the rise of a prominent British medical family in the twentieth century. From wars to a pandemic, the discovery of penicillin to the birth of the NHS, successive generations of the Burnett family are at the vanguard of life-saving developments in medicine.

Frontline is the story of an aristocrat’s daughter who joins the war effort as a nurse. In a field hospital in rural France she meets Will, a dockworker’s son serving as a stretcher-bearer. As rumours of an armistice begin to circulate, so too does a mysterious respiratory illness that soldiers are referring to as the ‘Spanish flu’.

Review

Frontline coverEvie is one of the characters who start off this book, which begins in 1910 and makes a shift to 1914. She has a baby and her story is sure to tug on many heartstrings, even the most hardened of hearts. It’s one of woe but also of courage of those around her.

Readers also follow Grace and other nurses as well as tells of how things were from a soldier, like Will’s story too and how they are linked and it becomes about them and their lives and needs to survive and what was happening in the world at the time, that they had to find ways of living in and doing their duties.

There’s a real rawness to one of the letters written, which gives further insight into what was going on and the fears that were there.

There’s the sense of life, distinct of the times and it feels like a lot of research went into this as well as passion for the subject matters. It may not be an easy read, but its authenticity and realism through fiction really shines through and develops into a great read. It takes readers to the heart of war, including The Somme, but also what it’s like to be home on leave, as Will is when he returns to Grace. There are also some lovely heartwarming moments too, that saves this book from being too bleak and in some instances, shows some humanity in the world too, especially when Christmas arrives.

Frontline is very apt for our times, as we try to survive Covid-19, this book also shows people trying to survive a pandemic too – Spanish Flu and the devastation to life between that and war. I think it could serve as something more thought-provoking about their own behaviours in present times.

The book is an intense but pertinent read. Dr. Hilary Jones has also left an “Author’s Note” at the back of the book that adds a little more about what is dubbed as “The Great War” and is poignant, as are the acknowledgements. I agree that there are some parallels that can be drawn from today between Spanish Flu times and Covid-19 times. It’s hard not to notice, if you know a bit about way back then too and thinking about it, even if you don’t, you’ll be able to find this by reading this book.

Clearly Dr. Hilary Jones is writing from what he knows from his medical background, but he’s intelligently combined this with war, of those fighting in it and of women who are not. There is a rich tapestry that runs through it and there is a sense that it’s a bit of a nod in a way to those who came before him and that sits very well with me, and I think it will with many other readers too.

Buy Links

Amazon                Waterstones

Ever Rest by Roz Morris @Roz_Morris #LiteraryFiction #Music #Fiction #BookClubFiction #BookClubs

Ever Rest
By Roz Morris

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Ever Rest is a terrifically absorbing book with suspense, almost lyrical text, from the characters to the concepts and scenery. It’s just so interesting too, like a behind the scenes of people’s lives in a way you don’t often see in the music world. It’s beyond those glossy magazines and newspaper articles, to the actual people in a band and people’s lives, right to a hearstopping moment, where the book begins… 
Thanks to Roz Morris for getting in touch to request a review on my blog and for gifting me with the book.

Please carry on down to the blurb and my review to find out more.

EverRest

Blurb

Twenty years ago, Hugo and Ash were on top of the world. As the acclaimed rock band Ashbirds they were poised for superstardom. Then Ash went missing, lost in a mountaineering accident, and the lives of Hugo and everyone around him were changed forever. Irrepressible, infuriating, mesmerizing Ash left a hole they could never hope to fill. Two decades on, Ash’s fiancée Elza is still struggling to move on, her private grief outshone by the glare of publicity. The loss of such a rock icon is a worldwide tragedy. Hugo is now a recluse in Nepal, shunning his old life. Robert, an ambitious session player, feels himself both blessed and cursed by his brief time with Ashbirds, unable to achieve recognition in his own right. While the Ashbirds legend burns brighter than ever, Elza, Hugo and Robert are as stranded as if they were the ones lost in the ice. How far must they go to come back to life? A lyrical, page-turning novel in the tradition of Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano, Ever Rest asks how we carry on after catastrophic loss. It will also strike a chord with fans of Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings and Taylor Jenkins Reid’s Daisy Jones for its people bonded by an unforgettable time; fans of Ann Patchett’s Bel Canto, for music as a primal and romantic force; and Jon Krakauer’s Into Thin Air for the deadly and irresistible wildernesses that surround our comfortable world.

Review

EverRestIt’s begins with a heart in the mouth moment, with a phone call no one on earth would ever want. This book is an excellent read. It would be great for reading alone or reading for a book club with the beautiful scenery against the suspense and the music beat.

Take a look at that cover! It is so cleverly conceived. It’s like a piece of modern art. There’s someone at the top of Mount Everest, but looks like either a CD or a record, where music, life and Nepal converge and all is not well and the cover looks torn, as lives have been tearing apart. The title is also a bit of a play on words and quite intelligent , 2 separated to mean one thing (Ever Rest) and bring them together and drop the “R” to create the mountain name – Everest.

Ashten from the band – The Ashbirds went missing in 1994 in Nepal. 18 years later, there’s some movement on this case and the intrigue to read on to see whether his body was ever found or not.

Elliott is an intriguing character and it feels like he is enraptured with Elza and her story as he sees pictures everywhere in the press and suddenly feels like he has a need to check out the press a lot to see what’s going on with her life. He is particularly fascinated about how she gets on in life, now that her fiancee, Ashten, is still missing in Nepal. There are sightings of bodies up Mount Everest that may have been him and not. It brings an absolutely captivating mystery element to what is essentially literary fiction.
The other characters – Hugo, Ari and Markson and Robert are also interesting too as they are kind of stuck with being associated with the band and also in what happened to Ashten.

Readers are treated to a back story and it’s like a behind the scenes of the music business and a band reaching the top of their game and all the pressures that comes with that and the very serious rifts.
Then band members, such as Robert wanted a solo career. Then what it takes to bring a band back together after so much history and complications.

The books also gives a bit of insight into how the press are and the assumptions they make in some of the questions they ask and also from the other-side, how certain magazines are courted and decisions made to give that exclusive story to.

It also brings about themes of grief and acceptance in different ways and moving forwards in life and what people have to deal with and how things affect them.

This is a thought-provoking story about the press, the music business and its highs and lows and also, almost poses the question as to how you would feel if someone you knew was high up on a mountain and one went missing and the other did not, as what happened to Hugo and Ashten, and then as Elza did, meet Hugo again some time later. It gives a lot of scope for book clubs to discuss and for readers not involved in one, a lot to really get involved with, to find out the outcome, which is more than worth hanging in there for…

This Is How We Are Human By Louise Beech @louisewriter @OrendaBooks #JubilantJune #BlogTour

This Is How We Are Human
By Louise Beech

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Today I have a review of the emotionally poignant –  This Is How We Are Human, that may spark some debate and plenty of talk in a book that is beautifully written and is somewhat uplifting too. The more I think about it, the more I think it is such a good and unique book. Find out more in the Blurb and my Review. Continue down to find out what inspired Louise Beech to write this story and a bit about her.
Thank you to Random Things Tours for inviting me onto the blog tour and for Orenda Books for gifting me the book

 

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Blurb

Sebastian James Murphy is twenty years, six months and two days old. He loves swimming, fried eggs and Billy Ocean. Sebastian is autistic. And lonely. Veronica wants her son Sebastian to be happy, and she wants the world to accept him for who he is. She is also thinking about paying a professional to give him what he
desperately wants. Violetta is a high-class escort, who steps out into the night thinking only of money. Of her nursing degree. Paying for her dad’s care. Getting through the dark.
When these three lives collide, and intertwine in unexpected ways, everything changes. For everyone!

Both heartbreaking and heartwarming, This Is How We Are Human is a powerful, moving and thoughtful drama about a mother’s love for her son, about getting it wrong when we think
we know what’s best, about the lengths we go to care for family and to survive.

Review

This_is_how_we_are_human proof aw (1)I reckon, even though this is quite different in some aspects, but readers who were swept along with “The Curious Incident With The Dog In the Midnight”, may also find they are with “This Is How We Are Human”. Although different in  that this is a man with ASD and the other was a boy with Aspergers, but I mention it because I have liked and totally appreciated both of these books.

Firstly, that cover is beautiful and as you read through the story, you’ll see it has some symbolism, including in the snowglobe, and emotion, in this deeply thoughtful book about subjects not often talked about.

Sebastian is Autistic and is now an adult with all the needs and desires of any other adult and a few extra. There is so much that parents who have children and adult offspring, will be able to relate to.
There’s a rawness about the story and sense of truth as it tells the story of a mother and son needing support and guidance for this next stage of life – adulthood.

It’s emotional and sometimes heartbreaking and a bit uplifting, but most of all, poignant and thought-provoking with some possible themes that may be controversial to some, but others would be open to debate, especially when it comes to Sebastian’s sexual desires and how they are handled. It’s a pretty unique book in the subject matter of an autistic adult who is suggestive and has desires like the majority of humans on the planet. 

You can see the frustrations and the love coming from Veronica who is desperate to help her son and also the challenges and complexities that surround this. It is emotional and pretty hard-hitting and yet the love of the mother to her son is tender, yet desperate to help him understand relationships and his sexual desires, so hires people to assist.

Aside from Sebastian, there is Isabelle who goes by the name, Violetta, who is trying to be brave and deal with her seriously ill dad, as it shows how being a high class escort and her home/personal life sit very differently next to each other. It also shows how much she needs support and the money to pay for her nursing career. She then becomes linked to Sebastian and lives alter.

How We Are Human, is ultimately a powerful book, which shows lives that may be different from your own and how some things are almost so unimaginably complex and brings topics to the fore that aren’t heard about being discussed so much; if at all in the wider world, in a highly emotionally charged way, mixed with love, desire, lust, family relations. It is beautifully written, without shying away from the biggest of subjects. The book becomes so absorbing and emotionally poignant and ends in a way, perhaps not quite as expected, but better than expected. 

Read the Author’s Note too in the book. I think it is important to as it will explain a little bit about ASD and a bit about a family who inspired Louise Beech to write this story.

Inspiration for This Is How We Are Human.

Louise B (1)“Though This is How We Are Human is fiction, the premise was inspired by my friends, 20-year-old
Sean, who is autistic, and his mum Fiona. Fiona had spoken to me about how much Sean longed to
meet a girl and have sex. No one talks about this, she said – the difficulties navigating romance often faced by those on the spectrum. It ’s an issue that I wanted to explore. Fiona and Sean encouraged me and guided me through the book; Sean regularly consulted on dialogue, rightly insisting that his voice was heard, was strong, and was accurate. I cannot thank my extraordinary friends enough for their help and support.” Louise Beech

About The Author

Louise Beech (1)Louise Beech is an exceptional literary talent, whose debut novel How To Be Brave was a Guardian Readers’ Choice for 2015. The follow-up, The Mountain in My Shoe was shortlisted for Not the Booker Prize. Both of her previous books Maria in the Moon and The Lion Tamer Who Lost were widely reviewed, critically acclaimed and number-one bestsellers on Kindle. The Lion Tamer Who Lost was shortlisted
for the RNA Most Popular Romantic Novel Award in 2019. Her 2019 novel Call Me Star Girl won Best magazine Book of the Year, and was followed by I Am Dust.

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#BookReview by Louise of Heckler by Jason Graff @JasonGraff1 #Fiction #LiteraryFiction

Heckler
By Jason Graff
Rated: 3 1/2 stars

Expect hotels and a world of music and large, deep themes which is more than the usual “coming of age” type of story that is within Heckler as you follow Bruno and the people he meets.
I thank Jason Graff for gifting me a copy to review.

Discover more about the author, the blurb and my review below.

About the Author

The author of numerous published short stories as well as the novella In the Service of the Boyar (Strange Fictions Press, 2016), Jason Graff loves both reading and producing writing that has a strong, clear voice and conveys a deep connection to the characters. In high school, his passion for the written word was well and truly ignited when he took a sucker punch for writing his crush a poem. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Bowling Green State University and later, his MFA in Creative Writing at Goddard College. The intense nature of that program allowed him to be mentored by a diverse group of talented writers which included: Sarah Schulman, Richard Panek, Darcey Steinke, and Rachel Pollack. Jason currently lives in Richardson, Texas with his wife, son, and their cat. He is currently working on a science fiction novel about the beginning of the end of the universe and another about a romancing con-man.
You can follow him on Twitter at @JasonGraff1 , on Facebook at Author Jason Graff and/or visit his website: .www.jasongraff.wordpress.com

Synosis

Heckler“…you’ll learn as you get older that time goes by quickly, especially for adults,” Ray Davis writes in a letter to his son that he hopes will explain why he’s been away for so long. In the two years since he last saw his father, Bruno, who once yearned to be entrusted with manning the desk of the family hotel on his own, has grown to resent every moment he’s forced oversee its empty lobby. His mother dreams that he’ll take over the business one day but Bruno has more immediate concerns. Adjusting to the changes his teenage body is going through is complicated by the attraction he feels to both sexes. His only escape is to the movie theater across the street, where he loses himself in the black and white world of Hollywood’s Golden Age. After being turned away from a showing of Psycho, he runs into his former tutor, Rick French. While the academic substance of those sessions largely has faded, Bruno never forgot how Rick had first awakened feelings that he’d been too young to understand. As they renew their relationship, Bruno begins to glimpse the man he can become. Though he’d like to act on his desires, he cannot help but still feel like a callow pupil in Rick’s presence. Stuck somewhere between maturity and childhood, Bruno strives to avoid the lonely future of a hotelier.

Heckler

Review

Hotels conjure up the image of luxury or shabby-chic or relaxed. The Shelby Hotel seems as far removed from luxury as Angus Sperint can get as he is greeted by Bruno, the receptionist/checking in person at the desk. It isn’t a normal check-in. Angus wants to stay for at least 8 weeks.

The story takes readers into an interesting insight of the hotel and its guests, including Buddy – a muscian, who plays Polka, so gives a little insight into his music world.
There are also insights into living in a hotel and being educated there.

It’s a book of a certain era, with its Jazz and Polka music and films, including Psycho, Strangers on a Train and Journey to the Centre of the Earth, showing at the cinema. Without totally pointing out the year all the time within the body of the book, Jason Graff has it all well depicted.

Growing up can be tough, as Bruno finds out too as he grapples with his teenage body and hormones and tries to work out who he is and wants to be. The relationships between different characters, as well as the hotel guests are interesting as they weave in and out of the hotel and surrounding places.

This however, seems a bit more grown-up than most “coming of age” stories and has some darker themes such as alcoholism too as there are characters trying to overcome it, There are also other quite deep themes and also in some ways a look at forgiveness within the book, in what is very much a literary fictional book adults can enjoy.
The book perhaps doesn’t delve quite deep enough into each theme in some ways for a novel, but they are there, within the characters lives and readers can still get to know them. It may take a little while to get into, but it is worth giving a chance because it is still a decent read and once you’re into the flow of it, then it’s okay for something just a little bit different, that may also grow on you as well, as it did me.

#QuickReviews of Great Summer Reads In Many Genres of Fiction Part 1 #SummerReads #MustReads #Fiction #CrimeFiction #Thriller #RomanticFiction #HistoricalFiction

Summer Reads
Various Books of Many Genres
By Various Authors

I’ve read a lot of books over this summer, so thought I would share some quick reviews of a few of them. They are in no particular order, except I’ve alternated a crime/thriller with another genre all the way down. I’ve chosen 18 to highlight. There are many genres from crime fiction to thrillers to rom-coms to uplit to historical fiction and more. I have added a link to each part so you can read a bit about the authors, the blurb and full review. I hope you enjoy and gain some inspiration. I am still reading and reviewing. There are many more coming up. Thank you in advance for taking time to read. I always appreciate it. If you click on Full Review for each book, that will take you to the original reviews, which are more in-depth and also have blurbs and more…

Daughers of Cornwall Cover

The Daughters of Cornwall by Fern Britton – Written with such sensitivity, candour and a little humour along the way; it is an all absorbing read. Set in 1918, 1939 and 2020, discover illigitamacy and family secrets in this atmospheric, well-plotted, compelling book. Click for Full Review

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Killing Rock by Robert Daws – Set in Gibraltar, discover the dark side of this island, with its backdrop lovely sun, sea and sand, in this twisty tale that grips and captivates to the end. Full Review

Miss Benson's Beetle Cover

Miss Benson’s Beetle by Rachel Joyce – Discover this wonderfully uplifting book about friendship and a new adventure, even when it takes a lot of determination to make things happen. The contrast between the characters is written so well, it’s a delight to read. Full Review

Secrets of Strangers Cover

The Secrets Of Strangers  by Charity Norman – a fast-paced psychological thriller that takes place in a cafe, with characters who intrigue with all their secrets as this unputdownable and enthralling book unfolds and characters unravel. Full Review

Miseducation of Evie Epworth Cover

The Miseducation of Evie Epworth By Matson Taylor – set in Yorkshire in the  1960’s, this is one of the wittiest books that I’ve read in a long time. There’s the fashions, the music, cake and Evie is trying to make a decision between heading to the bright lights of Leeds or NYC. It already has a lot of recognition and made it to the Radio 2 Book Club. I am informed there will be a second one. Full Review

Hinton Hollow Death Trip Cover

Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver – a page-turner of a psychological thriller set in a small place called Hinton Hollow, follow the most unexpected and original narrator, around the area as you meet the characters and see how they mirror society and if there is hope of anything getting better. Full Review

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Summer on A Sunny Island by Sue Moorcroft – Sun, sea, sand and perhaps a bit of romance on a gorgeous island; all wrapped up in a book that is perfect for lazing with in the sun. Full Review

Before I Say I Do Cover

Before I Say I Do By Vikki Bradley – A rivetting thriller set around a wedding day, supposedly the happiest day of your life. The wedding day is fast approaching and yet there are secrets that the bride would rather not emerge . It’s a thriller that is hard to resist and to put down. Full Review

With or Without You Cover

With or Without You by Drew Davies – A life can change in a second. One day you’re doing the mundane and everything is taken for granted. The next, everything changes. It certainly has a great observed, captivating plot. Full Review

What Lies Beneath

What Lies Beneath by Adam Croft – First in a brand new series set in Rutland, it gets off to a great start as readers get to know the police and Rutland and some bodies that are emerging. Full Review

The Geometery of Holding Hands cover

The Geometry of Holding Hands Hands by Alexander McCall Smith is the latest installment of  the delightful Philosophy Club/Dalhousie series. With the return of many wonderful characters and an inexpected offer given to Isabelle, involving a Highland estate. It’s a book that will engage and delight fans. Full Review

The Bobby Girls Secrets

The Bobby Girls Secrets By Johanna Bell. Follow this fascinating and enjoyable series about the first volunteer women policewomen. This is the second in the series and I am informed that there is a 3rd in the pipeline. The first is called The Bobby Girls. The bonds of friendship intrigue as do the storylines and this time they aren’t all in one area. Bobby Girl has a new opportunity. There are also interesting photos of the real Bobby Girls and a bit of info about them in the closing pages of the book. Full Review

The Colours Cover

The Colours by Juliet Bates – A bright, bold, incredible book about a character with synisthesia. With exquisitely observed writing, it is a highly absorbing read that will take any reader to the beach and on a trip through someone’s life. Full Review

LionHeart by Ben Kane

Lion Heart by Ben Kane – Don the armour in this atmospheric, compelling book that transports readers into the rich landscape of Richard LionHeart. Forge weaponry and battle, but the action doesn’t stop there as it is much more nuanced than that and focuses on more than just war, which makes it an excellent book in the first in this new series. Full Review

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 Dance With The Reaper by Wes Markin – Put on your dancing shoes, embrace the reaper and dance through life and death and find the murderer with DCI Yorke. It compels, intrigues and surprises. Full Review

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Perfume Paradiso by Janey Jones – Wake up and smell the perfume and travel through the pages to explore Italy to create a new perfume and perhaps find love, is what comes in this delightful romantic comedy. Full Review

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The Strange Book of Jacob Boyce by Tom Gillespie – Set between Glasgow, Scotland and Spain, life and art collide, making this an emotional, exquisitely written book that takes readers into a possible forgery and then there’s Jacob’s relationship, but will it survive?Full Review

The Garden of Forgotten Wishes Cover

The Garden of Forgotten Wishes by Trisha Ashley takes you into a beautiful garden and charming characters lives; some of them quite unexpected as an unlikely lot volunteer to bring a garden into the vibrant state it was once in, even though personal lives aren’t always straight-forward. This is a joyful, uplifting summer read. Full Review