#Review By Lou of #Middlegrade #book The Boy Who Dared By Rachel Coverdale @RLCoverdale #ChildrensBook #TheBoyWhoDared

The Boy Who Dared
By Rachel Coverdale

Rating: 5 out of 5.

I have a review for action/adventure middle grade book – The Boy Who Dared. The next book to The Boy Who Couldn’t. An excellent book to also have at home, in libraries, in school book clubs or to open class discussions with. There are questions at the back of the book to assist such activities. Thanks to Rachel Coverdale for getting in touch again to review this next book in the series. Discover the blurb and review below.

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Blurb

Action adventure story, suitable for 8-12 year-olds

A fun camping trip turns dangerous when James, Greg and Ahmed stumble across a dark secret in the beautiful Welsh wilderness. Separated on a mountainside in the dead of night, the boys must face their greatest fears as they are hunted by a ruthless gang. Can they reunite in time to save a hundred starving dogs – and themselves?

Review

The book re-joins readers with the first book – The Boy Who Couldn’t, although there are hints of what happened previously, so it is fine for readers to start here if they so wish. The dynamics of the relationships between Greg, James and Ahmed. Previously not friends, now things have moved on more positively as apologies have been made. The 3 boys are off on a camping holiday in Wales in scenic countryside amongst so much nature. From here, the boys end up in an adventure and mystery surrounding some farmers and dogs. There are also moments of trepidation as they come up against a gang.
Heroes aren’t always in capes. There are characters children can really get behind in this book.

The character and plot development is terrific and there are some great illustrations too.

Its a book that 8 to 12 year olds can so easily get really engaged in, as many have with ‘The Boy Who Couldn’t’.

By the end, it sets itself up nicely perhaps for another book in this series, which is absolutely worth following. This book isn’t just for Christmas, it’s great for all year round reading!

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#Review by Lou of The Ultimate Guide To Growing Dragons By Andy Shepherd Illustrated By Sara Ogilvie @andyjshepherd @PiccadillyPress #MiddleGrade part of #TheBoyWhoGrewDragons #ChildrensBook series #TheUltimateGuideToGrowingDragons

The Ultimate Guide To Growing Dragons
By Andy Shepherd
Illustrated By Sara Ogilvie

Rating: 5 out of 5.

The Ultimate Guide to Growing Dragons is the latest in bestselling series – The Boy Who Grew Dragons series, popular with and great for 7 years old plus  series with adventure, dragons, friendship and nature and more to feed curious minds. Fly down to the blurb and then my review below. I first thank Andy Shepherd for requesting a review from me.

 

Blurb

Did you see it?

A bright fleck of colour, darting into the green. You saw it, didn’t you? I knew you would! Because you’ve got your eyes open.

And now you want to grow dragons too.

Well here’s my guide with all the things I wish I’d known sooner. Of course, what I didn’t realise when I started writing it was how much I still had to learn!

Review

The previous book in the series was going to be the last, but then I guess another dragon grew or all the dragons got together and flew over and whispered in the author’s ears to plant a new idea in her brilliant imagination. This book imparts the secrets of dragons. Real dragons in the forest and sand and more in an engaging plot.

There is the Superhero Squad – Liam, Ted, Tomas, Aura, Kat and Kai, all in different parts of the world, which has Liam working out all the time differences. Each character has something interesting to say to feed curious minds about where they are in the world. It is also great for young gardeners too.
Children will learn that dragons are indeed all around them as the books delve into dragon fruits and more… It’s all written in an exciting, engaging style for children. There are pages set out like collecting cards about the dragons that are with each character that say about the name, the type, physicality, diet special skills, dragonality and special skills. Look out for the warnings too… You’ll also discover where to keep your dragons and so much more such as Polaris all within adventure and friendships.

The illustrations are wildly good fun and there’s a bit at the back of the book for children to write their own guide to growing a dragon.

This book is a terrific addition to this series of books, which I also highly recommend for adventurous, curious children.

#Review By Lou of Fool’s Gold By PJ Skinner @PJSkinnerAuthor #Adventure @LoveBooksTours

Fool’s Gold
By PJ Skinner

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Adventurous and in need of exploration? Fool’s Gold is for you. Find out more in the blurb and review below. Thanks to Love Book Tours for the review opportunity and the book.

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Blurb

Sam’s dream job awaits in the jungle, but so does a dangerous secret; Will her first adventure be her last?

When geologist Sam Harris finishes university, she is determined to make her mark in a man’s world. But exploration roles are hard to come by. Desperate for her first job, Sam accepts a contract with Mike Morton, a dodgy entrepreneur, searching for gold in the remote rainforests of Sierramar.

Sam soon questions her decision, as she struggles with a violent colleague, and living conditions in the field. But everything changes when she photographs some Inca steps hidden deep within the jungle, which may lead to an ancient archaeological site.

Mike sends her back to the site to search for artifacts with a drunken historian. But rumours about priceless Inca relics have spread among their team, and Sam is deep in the jungle, far from help.

Can she trust her colleagues, or is one of them planning to take the fabled treasure for himself?

If you like classic adventure stories with gutsy female protagonists, exotic locations, and complex characters, then you’ll love PJ Skinner’s thrilling novel.

Review

Sam Harris has just qualified as a bone-fide geologist. The book touches on certain subjects many singletons get asked about marital status and also the fussing that Matilda does in the rather uninspiring family home in Scotland. It makes you see why the need for adventure. It sets the scene well for her roots, before she heads off to a job she has been offered in Sierramar by Mike Morton, whom her parents have many reservations about, but Mike has a lot to stake as an entrepreneur and this latest mission has got to succeed. There’s a bit of politics, which isn’t entirely necessary, except it does help in giving a time frame. Thankfully it doesn’t go on for long and the adventurous side of the book continues, in search of treasure – gold. It isn’t all just adventuring and the social dynamics between the crew, there’s also an insight into Sierramar. It shows some of what seems like a dark underbelly of the place and some of the harshness.

The adventure itself is riveting and exciting as they journey deeper in the jungle and to see what discoveries are made, surrounding the Incas. This is where this book’s strengths really lie. The rest of the book’s topics make valid points, but it’s the true depths of adventure that holds interest and grips.

 

 

#Review By Louise of The Extraordinary Adventures of Alice Tonks By Emily Kenny @Emilie_London @emilykennyauthor @rocktheboatnews #ExtraordinaryAdventuresofAliceTonks @RandomTTours #BlogTour #ChildrensBook #MiddleGrade

The Extraordinary Adventures of Alice Tonks By Emily Kenny

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Today I am on the blog tour for the entertaining, mysterious, adventurous middlegrade book of The Extraordinary Adventures of Alice Tonks. Thanks to Random T. Tours and publisher Rock The Boat for inviting me to review and for the book. Find the blurb and review below.

Blurb

“It’s not your chips I’m after, Alice Tonks,” the seagull said sternly. “We’ve got a job for you.”

After a rather strange encounter with a seagull on her first day of boarding school, Alice Tonks is left with a lot of questions.
Why does the bird need her help? And WHY can she talk to seagulls?
Alice is used to being by herself but she can’t solve the mystery alone. With new friends behind her, can Alice harness her magic powers and become the hero she never imagined?

A story about finding your voice, friendship and unlikely heroes, for fans of A Kind of Spark 

Review

The Extraordinary Adventures of Alice Tonks tells the story of an 11 year d autistic protagonist who is in Pebbleworth Boarding School and there’s a beach. She hates both! From there is a big adventure and a discovery of magic and powers. There’s quite a bit of humour in what is a great setting where there’s plenty of action and mystery and strangely disappearing animals.

The story is fresh, with elements of the familiar. It’s entertaining for 8 years plus, with lots to solve and get gripped by.

Octavia Bloom and the Missing Key By Estelle Grace Tudor #Spotlight on #OctaviaBloomAndTheMissingKey@E_G_Tudor @BBNYA_Official @The_WriteReads @WriteReadsTours #BBNYA2021 #BlogTour

Octavia Bloom and the Missing Key
By Estelle Grace Tudor

I received this information about Octavia Bloom and the Missing Key, which is a BBNYA Finalist, to write a spotlight on it, to highlight it as part of the 2021 BBNYA competition and the BBNYA tours organised by the TWR Tour team. All opinions are my own, unbiased and honest. Firstly, a little bit about BBNYA and then onto discover a bit more about book itself and how to purchase it, as I shine a spotlight onto Octavia Bloom and the Missing Key.

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BBNYA is a yearly competition where Book Bloggers from all over the world read and score books written by indie authors. If you are an author and wish to learn more about the BBNYA competition, you can visit the official website http://www.bbnya.com or twitter @bbnya_official.

The sign-ups will soon be open for the 2022 BBNYA competition, be it for authors to enter their books, or for bloggers wanting to be part of the new panel, so keep your eyes peeled!!

Now onto the book – Octavia Bloom and The Missing Key. The cover itself is enticing with the giant key for the fairy door, to turn and see what happened to it and what adventures that ensue. The book has mysterious intrigue and secrets to discover, a couple that are life-changing. There’s a quest to reunite a family in this book that will take readers to deeper and deeper into the pages that are just as you go “Through The Fairy Door”. Check out the cover and the blurb below…

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Blurb

One tiny discovery can have enormous consequences…

Almost 10-year-old Octavia Bloom is looking for adventure, but when it comes it’s in the shape of a tiny fairy door.

Dragging her reluctant sister and cousins into the mystery, Octavia discovers her family are hiding not ONE but TWO life-changing secrets.

Why is her mother searching for an elusive flower? And does she have what it takes to reunite her fractured family?

Octavia’s certain the answers lie behind the fairy door, if only she could just find the key…

Bravery, secrets & magic intertwine in this fantastical adventure

Links

Publisher: Inlustris      Length: 228 Pages          Date Published: July 20, 2020

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.ca/Octavia-Bloom-Missing-Through-Fairy-ebook/dp/B089QQDQNS  (Canada)

https://www.amazon.com/Octavia-Bloom-Missing-Through-Fairy/dp/1838029206  (USA)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Octavia-Bloom-Missing-Through-Fairy/dp/1838029222 (UK)

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/53863194-octavia-bloom-and-the-missing-key

#BookReview by Lou of Fireborn @flowler_aisling @HarperCollins @The_WriteReadsTours #UltimateBlogTour #Fantasy #Adventure #ChildrensBook #MiddleGrade 8-12years #ReadingForPleasure #PrimarySchoolReading

Fireborn
By Aisling Fowler

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Fireborn is an immersive and exciting adventure into a fantasy world for 8-12 year olds. Go on an adventure down to the blurb and the rest of my review to find out more. Thanks to The Write Reads Tours for inviting me and to this group and Harper Collins for gifting me a book.

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Blurb

Set in the snowy northern forests of an imagined prehistoric world, Fireborn is the middle-grade debut of the decade. At turns exciting, funny and heart wrenchingly sad, it marks the introduction of an unstoppable new voice in children’s storytelling.

Twelve has spoken the Pledge and now she is a Huntling. She has given up her name to train in the art of fighting monsters and keeping the peace, and she won’t get to choose a new one until she has earned it.

But when the Lodge’s walls are breached for the first time, and a little girl is taken, Twelve is the only one interested in going after a child . . .

Teaming up with Dog, the Stone Guardian of the Lodge, Twelve ends up on an epic adventure that will change her life, her name – and her entire world.

Review

Fireborn coverFireborn is an epic adventure for 8-12 year olds. It has twists and turns and great characterisation, but with a difference. The characters are known by numbers, it sort of works to bring about something different to fiction, but once into the story, it isn’t the names that matter quite so much as the world of Ember takes over as do the characters lives. I think children will get into it though because above the giving up of names is a world for adventurous middle-grade readers can step into. For a debut novel, this is an author children would want more of, after reading this one. It has humour and breathtaking excitement as well as some of the saddest storylines. All this in one book makes it totally full on and the deeper you read, the deeper children will want to go into Ember, a fantastical world that builds on the page in wide ranging, indepth descriptions. It means readers can be totally immersed in Ember whilst reading it.

There are heroes and villains. The heroes are characters who have given up their names. They are known as Five, Six, Seven and Twelve. The villains are an array of monsters. There is the lodge where the young trainee Hunters go to hone their skills. These trainees land themselves a mission which takes them on a trail to The Fozen Forest. There are clans, who the Hunters have to act as protectors of, but it isn’t an easy task.

Twelve is the most promising Hunter but has issues and is far from friendly or a team-player as a result of making more enemies. The others also have their own issues. The book, in a way, shows that even heroes are not perfect and are not infalliable. This, even in such an all encompassing fantasy tale, this brings a bit of realism to it as the characters all find out a bit more about themselves in many ways, sometimes positive, other times negative and in some ways, in being resilient in times of trouble. It brings added interest to the otherwise, adventureous book, with a bit of magic within it. There’s a lot for children to dip their toe in and to be entertained.