#Review By Lou of Rebel Girls – Climate Change Warriors #RebelGirls #MiddleGrade #NonFiction #ChildrensNonFiction #ChildrensBook #Climate #Summer #Outdoors #Nature

Rebel Girls – Climate Change Warriors

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This middle-grade book was gifted by the people behind the Rebel Girls series, so I thank them.
I’m no stranger to these books having reviewed one and then continually been gifted them thereafter in exchange of an honest review. You can find out more in the blurb and my review below.

Rebel Girls Climate Warriors cover

Blurb

With fairytale-like stories about Greta Thunberg, Autumn Peltier, and Rachel Carson, Rebel Girls Climate Warriors: 25 Tales of Environmental Allies spotlights the world-changing work of women on the frontlines of the fight for climate justice. Meet conservationists, activists, water protectors, philanthropists, authors, and other women from all over the world who have stood up to polluters and used their amazing talents to protect the planet. Climate Warriors is part of the award-winning Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls series.

Join Greta Thunberg for a climate strike. Plant a tree with Wangari Maathai. Stand with water protector Autumn Peltier. And turn trash into profits and independence with Isatou Ceesay. Rebel Girls Climate Warriors tells the stories of the ingenuity and commitment of these women and more, including Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood, Japanese mountaineer Junko Tabei, Indigenous Ecuadorian leader Nemonte Nenquimo, and Thai landscape architect Kotchakorn Voraakhom.

This collection of 25 stories follows in the footsteps of the New York Times best-selling series Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. It is illustrated by female and nonbinary artists from around the world.

Review

The book follows the format of the others of a brief description and then a picture of the person it is referring to in illustration form. This time it focuses on those who have featured on the news and other mediums, but that’s not to say that whatever you do, however big and small doesn’t count, it does. This is often where these books fall down slightly. In saying that, the book ends with a small and useful bit (although by no means exhaustive list) about what people can feasibly do to help.

The people who are chosen have been chosen well because it isn’t always the most obvious people like Greta Thunberg or water activists etc, there are people from places you may not expect, who have shown care for the environment, such as people from politics and journalism and authors too. It is these people that make this book stand out more than it otherwise perhaps would, just because it is perhaps not what you think of first.

The information provided is short and to the point, covering a bit about what they do, who they are and their care about the environment and climate change and will capture the imagination of children and is a good talking point. The layout and tone as ever is well-pitched for the age group most likely to read this ever-growing series.

Adventure Caravanning With Dogs – It Never Rains But It Paws By Jacqueline Lambert @JacquelineLambertAuthor @RandomTTours #ItNeverRainsButItPaws #WorldWideWalkies #Dogs #Caravanning #TravelMemoir #Travelogue #NonFiction

Adventure Caravanning With Dogs
It Never Rains But It Paws
By Jacqueline Lambert

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Adventures and human and dog interest abound in Adventure Caravanning With Dogs. Thanks to Random T. Tours for inviting me to review this travelogue. Join these pooches on an adventure like no other… (a pic of cute dogs is included in this review).
Discover more in the synopsis and my review below.

It Never Rains Graphic 1

Synopsis:

Five years after giving up work to travel full time, Jackie and Mark race against time to leave the UK before Britain leaves the EU. If Brexit happens, their four precious pups may lose their pet passports, and will be unable to travel. But Brexit isn’t their only obstacle. A few months into their trip, the pandemic leaves them trapped in Europe’s No.1 coronavirus hotspot…

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Review

This, in many ways is a trip of our times and in years to come, will serve as a reminder of how things were during the pandemic. In all of its fun and hilarity it reminds, in someways, that trips, however long or short an adventure people go on, should not be taken for granted because anything can happen…
This is perfect for armchair travelling and perhaps inspiring bucketlists or for giving a picture of some hometruths when worldwide events happen and you have adorable pooches in tow.
The locations that feature are France and Italy.

Jackie Lambert with Fab Four Web Size ColourIt all starts rather well on a journey across to France by ferry, as the memoir turns into quite the interesting travel-logue, with some historic facts here and there, adding extra interest to the places, Jacqueline and her furry, pawed friends go to. Not everything is plain-sailing as she and Mark runs into some issues and the rainy weather doesn’t help matters. 

Mixed in with intrpid travels, are some politics about Brexit, although for a short spell, it gets a little heavy, it nonetheless doesn’t detract from the rest of the book as it then proceeds into the consequences to what had been unlimited travel around the European countries that are (at time of writing), still part of the EU, so for the main part, there is a point to bringing this up, as she navigates this.

It also documents some of the huge diseases the world had encountered, whilst travelling, including the global pandemic, brought by Covid-19, which Jacqueline encounters and ends up in a hotspot of in Italy, on her own, since Mark had to go back home to sort out a different sort of problem, beforehand, meaning they are separated more than what they may have been otherwise.

Even through, what was, at the time, unexpectedly hard times, there are snippets of some humour and some things that this couple have learnt along the way.

It goes to show that travelling, however well planned, isn’t always quite as smooth as it first seems, in this adventrous human story that is interesting and entertaining and emotional on many different levels. So, this is a book I recommend, so hop into this caravan from your armchair and join these pooches on their adventure of a lifetime.

It never rains BT Poster

#Review By Lou Don’t Panic! All the Stuff The Expectant Dad Needs To Know By George Lewis @georgelewiscom @Octopus_Books @RandomTTours #DontPanic #BlogTour #Humour #NonFiction #NewDads #Parenthood #ExpectantDads #Comedy

Don’t Panic!
All The Stuff The Expectant Dad Needs To Know
By George Lewis

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Dont Panic Graphic 3 (1)

Dont Panic Graphic 2A must read for all expectant dads! This book has it all, along with plenty of humour from well-known comedians. Thanks to Random T Tours and Octopus Books for inviting me to close the blog tour with my review and for gifting me a copy of the book. Discover more in the blurb and my review below…

Blurb

Are you ready for fatherhood?

Don't panic TwitterWritten by award-winning comedy writer, George Lewis, DON’T PANIC! is destined to be
the next classic for new dads, preparing them for the confusing, emotional – and funny –
rollercoaster ahead.
From birth to pre-school, EVERYTHING new dads need to know is here. The book is
packed with useful tips, inside knowledge and hilarious real-life stories from George’s
friends and fellow comedians, who know exactly what it’s like to take your first steps as a
new parent, including, Adam Kay, Andy Parsons, Carl Donnelly, Elis James, Iain Stirling,
Ivo Graham, Jen Brister, Josh Widdicombe, Kerry Godliman, Matthew Crosby, Rich
Hall, Romesh Ranganathan, Russell Kane and Sindhu Vee.
Practical and emotional this is a book full of all the stuff your mates would tell you. Friendly,
accessible, informative and funny, Don’t Panic is the vital guide that reassures new dads
that they’re not alone, and demonstrates how helpful the experience of others can be.

Review

This isn’t your usual sort of parenthood or parent to be book. This has so much humour that dad’s would certainly relate to, as well as handy-tips, split into bite-sized chunks. There are even snippets that new mum’s would be able to relate to as well. It goes through everything from scans, the bump, changes, building up the nursery right through to nappy changing and bathtime. It also deals with baby loss.

The balance between humour and the serious is good and all is informative. What is good about this is that it has the input of so many well-known, well-liked comedians such as Rich Hall, Andy Parsons, Adam Kay, Josh Widdecombe and many more, so readers can see a mix of points of view and have their humour coming through too, which enhances the book.

The book reads well with the narrative of George Lewis and the comedians interjecting in with their experiences.

I highly recommend Don’t Panic to all expectant dad’s or even those who have just been through that stage, for a look back with a laugh.

About The Author

Don't Panic authorGeorge Lewis’s writing credits include Have I Got News for You, 8 out of 10 Cats, various
work for BBC Comedy, Radio 4, Dave, Comic Relief and his own weekly football column – Funny Old Game – in The Times. He has recently appeared on the Stand Up Sketch Show (ITV2), Top Gear Extra Gear (which he hosted), Celebrity Mastermind (which he won) and he presents the Britpopcast for Radio X. Before he became a comedian, he worked as a copywriter. He lives in Manchester with his wife and his two children, a boy and a girl, fourteen months apart.

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#BookReview By Lou of #TravelMemoir – Thinking On My Feet – The Joy of Putting One Foot In Front of Another By Kate Humble @katehumble @Octopus_Books #NonFiction #Walks #ThinkingOnMyFeet #TravelWriting #Travelogue #Memoir #KateHumble #Travel

Thinking On My Feet
The Joy of Putting One Foot In front of Another
By Kate Humble

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Thinking on My Feet is an inspiring, interesting travel memoir full of places to walk, the people Kate Humble met and their walk of life. Thanks to Octopus Publishing for gifting me this book. Discover more below in the blurb and my review below…

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SHORTLISTED FOR THE WAINWRIGHT PRIZE**    Thinking on my feet
** SHORTLISTED FOR THE EDWARD STANFORD
    TRAVEL WRITING AWARD

– TRAVEL MEMOIR OF THE YEAR                                                         

 

Blurb

Thinking on my feetI’ve discovered that going for a daily walk has become as essential to me feeling good for the rest of the day as that first cup of tea. But I would argue that all I am doing is responding to a natural need we all have. Humans have always been migrants, the physiological urge to be nomadic is deep-rooted in all of us and perhaps because of that our brains are stimulated by walking. I solve all sorts of problems, formulate ideas, work things out to that gentle rhythm of self-propelled movement.’ – Kate Humble

Thinking on My Feet tells the story of Kate’s walking year – shining a light on the benefits of this simple activity. Kate’s inspiring narrative not only records her walks (and runs) throughout a single year, but also charts her feelings and impressions throughout – capturing the perspectives that only a journey on foot allows – and shares the outcomes: a problem solved, a mood lifted, an idea or opportunity borne. As she explores the reasons why we walk, whether for creative energy, challenge and pleasure, or therapeutic benefits, Kate’s reflections and insights will encourage, motivate and spur readers into action.

Also featured are Kate’s walks with others who have discovered the magical, soothing effect of putting one foot in front of the other – the artist who walks to find inspiration for his next painting; the man who takes people battling with addiction to climb mountains; the woman who walked every footpath in Wales (3,700 miles) when she discovered she had cancer.

This book will inspire you to change your perspective by applying walking to your daily endeavours

Review

This is a lovely descriptive book where you can follow in the footsteps of Kate Humble on her walks. The subtitle – “The Joy of Putting One Foot Infront of Another” appears to perhaps have two meanings. She seems to enjoy going on various walks, which means putting one foot in front of another to move, but along the way, she meets up with various people who are metaphorically putting one foot in front of each other (or taking one day at a time), as life presents itself and so to just try to lead life to overcome various issues they have with their physical health, addictions and more… and are also using extreme walking to help them overcome these, to improve their lives and outcomes.  There is also, just in general, the joy of not knowing who you might meet whilst out walking and then finding out the path in life and in a geographical sense, they are taking.

The book is written to, even if in a small way, spur people on and to inspire them to walk. I myself enjoy walking, nothing strenuous or as big as a huge hillwalk for the most part, but walking features in my life, and recently walked for MS Society to raise money for them. I also find, as this book talks about, that creativity can be inspired by walking. I mostly do it for pleasure and fun or to go somewhere as walking is a mode of transport if you like.

There are many reflections on walks throughout a year that Kate Humble writes about, sometimes in fascinating places, sometimes meeting people, she perhaps may not have met otherwise and probably not in her daily life, which perhaps added to her own inspiration. Thinking on my Feet has a mix of emotions written through it, from when Kate Humble is feeling lonely 

All in all, it is an interesting book that is great for dipping in and out of and will perhaps spark inspiration in many readers.

Discover a little of #NonFiction #Book Twentyone Olive Trees By Laura Formentini @FormentiniLove @igbooks @lovebookstours #BlogTour #BlogBlitz #TwentyoneOliveTrees

Twentyone Olive Trees
By Laura Formentini

Today I have an interesting and perhaps rather different book called Twentyone Olive Trees to share the blurb with you all. The author has something to tell you about some rather shocking news she received and how she coped with the tragedy of what happened… Disover the blurb below…

Twentyone Olive Trees

Nothing could have prepared Laura Formentini for the shocking news of her son’s death by suicide. Seeking solace during her time of grief, Laura turned inward to transform her pain and shock into healing and peace. She accomplished this by writing letters, poems, and fables to her son, Blaise, in the year after his untimely death. This became the beautiful tribute Twentyone Olive Trees: A Mother’s Walk through the Grief of Suicide to Hope and Healing. This book traces the author’s path from grief to understanding and healing. Laura shares the important message that it is in your power to overcome even the most traumatic events by creating something beautiful in the wake of death, divorce, disease, and destruction from natural and man-made disasters. Inspired by teachers like Deepak Chopra, Laura achieved her own healing transformation through creatively writing the morals and wisdom she gained in the twenty-one years with her son. The fables, accompanied by beautiful illustrations, have a playful, childlike way of helping the reader cope with loss and embrace acceptance and healing. It is Laura’s hope that these stories will act as a balm for those going through their grief and dark moments, while encouraging them to embrace their new beginnings. This is the perfect book to help those seeking to heal and transform in the wake of a traumatic loss.

About the Author

Laura Formentini is a nonprofit photographer, activist, and fundraiser. A member of Photographers Without Borders, she lives nomadically with her family.

#BookReview By Lou – Mother of the Brontes By Sharon Wright #SharonWright @penswordbooks #NonFiction #Biography #Brontes #MariaBranwell #TheLifeOfMariaBranwell

Mother of the Brontes
The Life of Maria Branwell
By Sharon Wright

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Mother of the Brontes is a highly interesting account of Maria Branwell. Thanks to Pen and Sword for gifting me the book. Discover what the book is about and my opinion in the blurb and my review.

Mother of the Brontes cover

Maria Branwell has spent 200 years in the shadow of her extraordinary children, Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë. Now the first biography of Mrs Brontë appears as a beautiful bicentenary paperback edition in October 2021, with a commissioned portrait of Maria at 38 based on the only two existing images in the Brontë Collection. Sharon Wright’s critically-acclaimed biography reveals Maria’s fascinating life as a Regency gentlewoman who went looking for an adventure and found one. A sudden passion and whirlwind love affair led to the birth of the most gifted literary siblings the world has ever known. From a wealthy home in Penzance, Maria was a contemporary of Jane Austen and enjoyed the social status of a prominent family with secrets. So how did Maria fall for the penniless curate she called ‘My Dear Saucy Pat’ hundreds of miles from the home she loved? And what adventures lead lover Patrick Brontë to their fateful meeting in Yorkshire? What family scandals did Maria leave behind in Cornwall? How did wealthy and independent Miss Branwell of balmy Penzance adjust to life as Mrs Brontë in Yorkshire during the industrial revolution? And what was her enduring legacy in the lives of those world famous daughters and troubled son?

Review

It is well documented about lives of the Bronte sisters – Charlotte, Anne and Shirley, through the novels and poetry they wrote and biographies other people have written, even more is known about their brother – Branwell Bronte and their father – Patrick Bronte than the matriarch of the Bronte family – Maria Branwell. This book goes some way to rectifying this biography of her life in this treasure of a book that uncovers her life and her part as an individual and as part of the family she created.

Really delving into history and setting the scene to create background to how things were in the time of Maria’s life, it goes into detail about the backdrop of socio/economical/political scenes. This I felt was necessary to people now and into the future to understand how things were and also puts her life into context. You really get under the surface of how the world looked when she was alive, not just in broader terms, but also the families she may have known or seen around Penzance in Cornwall, the houses that were there and religious beliefs. It provides a focused texture and understanding in the first few chapters.

The book becomes even more compelling to discover why Patrick, so penniless, left Ireland and Maria leaves Cornwall for Yorkshire and how they courted each other and fell in love, even though there was class division of him being poor and her being wealthy, with social standing, but attraction and love won out, however unlikely that would initially seem, but they did and created a life and family together.
There are letters of this period of time, which were later handed down the family. There are extracts of her letters in the book, that feels really special to read and gives readers a glimpse into her letter writing style and means the book is able to retain some of her “voice” for present and future generations. It heightens providence and a real care of the Bronte family. The research is meticulous and the passion of its author – Sharon Wright to ensure this part of the family’s history can be read about in this way, really shines through.

There’s a look into day to day life within the Parsonage that really brings the place, that is still standing, located in Harrogate, Yorkshire, England, (now a museum), to life. It shows life within those walls of husband and wife and their children, who, especially their daughters, were to become literary giants, whose work is still popular and is now shown in many media forms. Lesser known however, is that Maria could also write and there is a little bit of this within the book.

The book takes readers right to the end of Maria’s life and the impact her death had on how the family then behaved in their day to day living and continuing of their own lives.

This is an absolutely fascinating read and to be able to read it in her bicentenary year makes it somewhat even more lovely.