#BookReview By Lou of The Way of The Tortoise By Matt Little @MattLittleSandC @OMaraBook @LoveBooksGroup #NonFiction #SelfImprovement #Selfhelp #BlogTour

Today I am delighted to be part of the blog tour for The Way Of The Tortoise by Matt Little. This is a great enlightening read that can be used as a useful tool by anyone from any walk of life. It also includes a foreword by tennis star – Andy Murray.
Find out more in the blurb and my review below as well as a little about the author.

The way of the tortoise

Blurb

Drawing on more than a decade’s experience working with former tennis World Number One Sir Andy Murray, The Way of the Tortoise introduces you to the benefits of the slow lane and reveals why it’s the only true path to a high-performance mindset.

Taking inspiration from Aesop’s well-known fable of the Hare and the Tortoise, internationally renowned trainer Matt Little recognizes that there is no fast path to success. By focusing on immediate results, we can gloss over process in the race to get ahead, skipping over the lessons and experiences that we all need to build solid foundations for our future achievements. Matt shows that taking the slow lane can not only help you reach your goals more effectively, it can make your successes more sustainable by increasing your motivation, energy and resilience. Packed full of examples from the highly adaptable worlds of sport and business, as well as Matt’s own remarkable career, The Way of the Tortoise reveals, through practical exercises and techniques, the essential strategies we can all use to achieve extraordinary results.

Review

The Way of The Tortoise is in 3 parts. Part 1 is The Way of The Tortoise so readers understand what that actually means in practical terms. Part 2 is called “Tortoise Goes To Boot Camp” where readers can delve deeper into the aspects mentioned in part 1. Then “Tortoise Boot Camp” where the book concludes. There are also practical exercises for people to try out and some questions they can answer to see what their outcome is and where they sit in this way of life etc.

The Way Of The Tortoise is a way of life. The book shows there really is something quite enlightening in that Aesop fable -The Hare and the Tortoise. Although The Way Of The Tortoise shows the life of getting to the top, although it of course has parts that talk about tennis and other sports, it is much more than that and has skills and advice for anyone from any walk of life. It inspires to follow and understand this way for anything and everything that anyone may embark on doing in their life. Everywhere, we see success as though it just happens over night, but the reality is, on the whole, it’s a lot of work for years before-hand. This book however reminds us why the slower lane is actually good and healthy.
The book is also about determination and resilience and showing that you may not make it into exactly what you want first off, but you can find different ways to do what you love. That’s what Matt Little has done and that is what makes this book, in my opinion inspirational. It shows a truth of how life can be and how it can be challenging and because of this truth and the fact everything didn’t just happen for Matt Little shows a groundedness that is often not shown.

The book focuses on skills anyone in any profession and in any sort of personal life can use and also shows the differences in traits between a hare and a tortoise way of life. It is spectacularly interesting working out if you’re a hare or a tortoise and which sort of tortoise you are. It turns out I am most likely to be a tortoise and this book is pretty validating. It also goes into different sorts of tortoise traits in people and what each type needs, which is very interesting. The book then also goes into how to become a “Winning Tortoise”, which I am sure many people will find helpful.

In part 2 – “Tortoise Goes To Bootcamp”, it shows ways to sharpen skills and how to get into the “Tortoise mindset” and why this way is sustainable and a way of winning. It talks about the importance of soft skills and goes more into the nuances of these as well as developing teams to be more like tortoises. It also goes into being able to work under pressure and dealing with failure. It also goes into how to align yourself well and to be connected with people, as well as drawing up future plans and strategising, managing conflict etc. It also talks about leading by taking action, however it also reminds people to take care of themselves and their loved ones. The book also goes into a 0-10 year plan and further years into the future and goes into detail about what seems like a slow game and why there are advantages to this.

Part 3 – The Tortoise Bootcamp offers a terrific conclusion and one that is positive and gives an element of hope. It also validates, as does the rest of the book, that way of life that is “The Way Of The Tortoise” that may be a life that is being lived, but may not have realised it is this particular way and that this way is actually okay enough.

It’s a very well structured book with many aspects that so many people will be able to implement into their own lives. The book is very interesting and has a lot of sense within it and is easy to follow. It’s also good for dipping in and out of.

About the Author

Matt Little has been working as a strength and conditioning coach in elite-level tennis for over fifteen years and has been an integral part of Sir Andy Murray’s team for twelve years, including during 2016 when Murray won Olympic gold, Wimbledon and became World Number One. He is an internationally recognized leader in his industry and in demand as a public speaker on a vast range of subjects, including youth development, and strength and conditioning.

The way of the tortoise (1)

#Bookreview by Lou of The Domestic Revolution by Ruth Goodman @OmaraBooks @LoveBooksTours #History #NonFiction

The Domestic Revolution
By Ruth Goodman
Rated: 4 stars ****

The Domestic Revolution takes readers to the 16th Century, where fascinating change is afoot. The Domestic Revolution is the start of the Industrial Revolution to accomodate changing desires. This Domestic Revolution firmly places changing times right into the home in a relatable way. Think history isn’t for you? Think again, The Domestic Revolution shows the progression of life and it is relatable to what we have today in an accessible style.
The book is already praised by her fellow historian – Lucy Worsley.
I thank Love Book Tours for inviting me onto the blog tour and for providing a beautiful hardback copy.
Follow down to the blurb and full review for more about the book and more of my thoughts on it.

The DomesticRevolution (1)

About the Author

For the first time, shows how the Industrial Revolution truly began in the kitchen – a revolution run by women|Told with Ruth’s inimitable wit, passion and commitment to revealing the nitty-gritty of life across three centuries of extraordinary change, from the Elizabethan to the Victorian age|A TV regular, Ruth has appeared on some of BBC 2’s most successful shows, including, Victorian Farm, Edwardian Farm, Wartime Farm, Tudor Monastery Farm, Inside the Food Factory and most recently Full Steam Ahead, as well as being a regular expert presenter on The One Show|The critically acclaimed author of How to Be a Victorian, How to be a Tudor and How to Behave Badly in Renaissance Britain

BlurbĀ 

A large black cast iron range glowing hot, the kettle steaming on top, provider of everything from bath water and clean socks to morning tea: it’s a nostalgic icon of a Victorian way of life. But it is far more than that. In this book, social historian and TV presenter Ruth Goodman tells the story of how the development of the coal-fired domestic range fundamentally changed not just our domestic comforts, but our world.

The revolution began as far back as the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, when London began the switch from wood to coal as its domestic fuel – a full 200 years before any other city. It would be this domestic demand for more coal that would lead to the expansion of mining, engineering, construction and industry: the Domestic Revolution kick-started, pushed and fuelled the Industrial Revolution.

There were other radical shifts. Coal cooking was to change not just how we cooked but what we cooked (causing major swings in diet), how we washed (first our laundry and then our bodies) and how we decorated (spurring the wallpaper industry). It also defined the nature of women’s and men’s working lives, pushing women more firmly into the domestic sphere. It transformed our landscape and environment (by the time of Elizabeth’s death in 1603, London’s air was as polluted as that of modern Beijing). Even tea drinking can be brought back to coal in the home, with all its ramifications for the shape of the empire and modern world economics.

Taken together, these shifts in our day-to-day practices started something big, something unprecedented, something that was exported across the globe and helped create the world we live in today.

The Domestic Revolution

Review

The Domestic Revolution takes readers through the midsts of time and how the excavation and use of coal had a real impact in shaping lives and expanding what could be achieved in the home. It was a real game changer when it came to, not just how homes could be heated and how people could bathe but also in how and what could be cooked. In our homes today, it may be hard to believe, especially for younger generations who have perhaps not experienced a coal fire etc, but this was a vast change in technological advancements and improvements to what industry could do and for what people in the home could do, especially where women were concerned.
There were advancements in soap-making and it shows that, even though humans now know that coal can’t last forever (it is worth bearing in mind that in the 16th century, this and the effects were not known, it was instead an exciting development), the things we do see today, may not have come into being may not have ever happened and we may not use what we do today as the technologies wouldn’t exist. So, as far as the book goes, it does make you think about the world today, but also reminds us that this was a big deal and much needed thing for many advancements of today. It was one that was brought about by ordinary people as well as the more wealthy that changed the landscape and has some positives and some negatives to it, as argued out in the book. There was a Domestic Revolution afoot and people wanted change and it sowed some of the seeds for the Industrial Revolution to be able to accomodate people’s desires, as illustrated in this beautifully bound book.

It makes for a fascinating book that can be easily dipped in and out of or read all at once. It’s fairly easy-going in style, once it gets going after a bit of a sluggish start. I guess, like the Industrial Revolution, nothing happens overnight. It makes you think that every time there is change in energy supplies, there will be pros and cons. Every sentence contains a dollop of information. It is well laid-out where the text is and the pictures are to convey and back up the written word.It is clearly well-researched and there is a huge bibliography that accompanies it at the back of the book.