#Bookreview by Lou of #Travelogue of In SatNav We Trust – A Travelogue by Jack Barrow @JackBarrowUK @RandomTTours #InSatNavWeTrust

In SatNav We Trust –
A search for meaning through historic counties of England
By Jack Barrow
Rated: 4 stars ****

This is a wonderfully adventurous book. It’s enough to have people yearning for travel and maybe aspire to exploring the UK.

I thank Anne Cater at Random Things Tours and Jack Barrow for inviting me onto the tour and for sending me a physical copy of the book.

Find out more about the book, my review and the author below.

Synopsis

In SatNav We Trust – a search for meaning through the Historic Counties of England is a journey through ideas of science and belief, all the while searching for meaning and a bed for the night. Or was that the other way around?

On May 1st 2013 I set off from Oxford on the trip of a lifetime. It wasn’t a trip around the world or up the Himalayas, I set off to visit every one of England’s 39 historic counties. These are the counties that used to exist before all the boundary changes that chopped Yorkshire into bits, got rid of evocative sounding names such as Westmorland, and designated the big cities as metropolitan boroughs. I wanted to visit England as it used to be, although that’s not quite how it turned out.

In SatNav We Trust started out as a travelogue exploring all the usual suspects, spectacular landscapes, architectural or engineering wonders, historic towns with their cathedrals and castles. However, it soon developed into a journey through ideas and beliefs, an exploration of how the rational and the apparently irrational jostle for position in human experience. The book discusses our fundamental scientific understanding of the universe when, deep inside us, we might be as irrational as a box of frogs. This context, the exploration of England—the places stumbled across with no day to day plan, created the backdrop for these ideas.

In Sat Nav Cover

Review

Firstly, what a fabulously witty title. It catches the eye pretty well. It promises a journey through historic counties of England and certainly delivers as it begins in Oxfordshire and goes to Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire, Suffolk, Cheshire, Yorkshire, Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, and many more.

He tells things how it is when travelling and in each place in his 4×4, and has even included the everyday places and items. He is also very honest in how he feels and how he almost gave up early on in this mammoth trip. Campsites seems to be the order of the day for accomodation. This isn’t just about all the tourist things that you can do, it’s very different from a travel book like that. It is indeed a full travelogue of the actual journey and what can be seen en-route, that some people may miss when passing through, the roads that are taken and the people who he meets, as well as the accomodation.

There is some humour within the trip that weaves in and out the interesting philosophising of life of the mix of rational and irrational anxieties that occur within people’s lives, including his own as he does some reflection. He manages, which seems like no mean feat, to think creatively about how to fit in Maslow’s theory of heirarchy, whilst in Rutland with what he is actually doing and expecting, in a way that is far from heavy reading.

The attention to detail in each place is great and it certainly is a fun trip, that becomes something more than just that with the observations of not just the places, but of life. It’s how this all binds together that makes the book engaging.

If you’ve travelled around England before, you’re certain, as I was, thinking, “been there, done that” and then finding places that may just have to go on that travel to-do list. If you’ve not done staycations before, then this book may inspire you to travel around England to visit many of the counties and discover for yourself what they hold.

About the Author

In Sat Nav We Trust Jack Barrow Author Pic. jpgJack Barrow is a writer of books and blogs about ideas based on popular philosophy in modern life. He is a critical thinker but not a pedant. He has an interest in spiritual perspectives having been brought up as both a Mormon and a Jehovah’s Witness. He’s not sure, but he believes this particular  ecclesifringical upbringing makes him a member of a pretty exclusive club. He is also fascinated by science. At the same age as his parents were taking him to church services, he was also watching Horizon documentaries and Tomorrow’s World, becoming fascinated about science and technology. Perhaps around the time of the moon landings, when he was six or seven, he came to the conclusion that, sooner or later, people would realise that the sky was full of planets and stars, science explained the universe, and that there was no God looking down. He really thought that religion’s days were numbered. Declining congregations seemed to back that up, but since then there has been a growth in grass roots movements that seem to indicate people are looking for something to fill the void left by organised religion. He now has a particular interest in the way people are creating their own spiritual perspectives (whatever spiritual means) from the bottom up using ideas sourced from history, folkloric sources and imagination. Rather ironically it was members of the Jehovah’s Witnesses who first introduced him to the landscape of Wiltshire, with its stone circles and ancient monuments, which later kindled his interest in spiritual beliefs taken from more ancient perspectives.

He has also written a novel; The Hidden Masters and the Unspeakable Evil is a story of a group of magicians who discover a plot to build casinos in Blackpool and so turn the resort into a seedy, tacky, and depraved town. During this hard-drinking occult adventure, with gambling and frivolous trousers, Nigel, Wayne and Clint travel north on Friday night but they need to save the world by Sunday evening because they have to be back at work on Monday morning.

Jack lives in Hertfordshire, England, where he earns a living writing about things in engineering; this usually means photocopiers and bits of aeroplanes. He shares his home with R2D2 and C3PO, occasionally mentioned in his blog posts. People used to say he should get out more. At the time of writing he is currently shielding from the apocalypse, having been of a sickly disposition as a child, and wondering if he will be able to go to a live music pub ever again.

In Sat Nav We Trust BT Poster

 

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Georgina by David Munro – set in Crete around world war two #Georgina #DavidMunro #Greece #SecondWorldWar #Fiction #Review

 

Georgina
By David Munro
Rated:4 stars ****

It is with thanks to David Munro for getting in touch with me via my blog to enquire about reviewing his book.

Portrait DMDavid Munro was born in Edinburgh and lived there until the age of 27.  He was employed by a major brewery within the capital and relocated to Aberdeen, then Glasgow.  David attended university and college to attain Chartered Marketer status. As an arts professional and with experience of different cultures, this lends itself to creative literature.

David’s love of history allows him the opportunity to delve into past cultures and pinnacle events. His latest novel, Georgina, has a Second World War theme, telling a story of heartache, romance and espionage.

As a writer, David’s ambition is to give his readers enjoyment through interesting stories with compelling characters. Georgina has one male and two female characters that readers will embrace. To achieve recognition in the form of a best-seller is a goal.

Blurb

Hollywood, 1930. Georgina, a personable fun-loving woman, sits alone with another large glass of wine for company. She has discovered that her actor partner has gambled away their mansion and is dating a young actress. To compound matters, Georgina is under suspicion for her husband’s murder a year earlier.

Georgina leaves America for the sanctuary of far-away Crete. With a new identity, she finds work as a teacher of music. Soon, she shares a property with Elena, a beautiful raven-haired socialite who has powerful, but dubious companions.

When invaded by the Germans, Crete is thrown into turmoil. Their soldiers begin a brutal occupation of the island and hardship ensues. By chance, Georgina meets a German officer and an unlikely romance blossoms. Because of her association with Erich Hoeness, she is suspected of being a spy.

Erich is a loyal soldier, but also has a conscience. He starts to siphon German food supplies to ease some islander’s starvation. However, given German atrocities on Crete, will this compassion save him and Georgina from savage retribution?

Georgina

Review

The cover is smart and evocative and is interesting with its light and shadowing.

 I like the way Eddie and Georgina are instantly introduced, there’s instant imagery and a feel for them. Georgina sits miserable, after the first 6 months with the very handsome Eddie being so happy. The year is 1931, LA and she fears her past could be reoccurring, just with a different set of people. She seems to have it all, a mansion, the guy, but all isn’t well at all as Eddie could be cheating on her with an actress. 1931 and things are changing in Hollywood, technology has come in that means talkies are on the way in and silent film is on its way out.

The way Marco Bellini is first introduced just over the phone and the shiftyness around his name adds curiosity about this now seemingly sinister character as well as the money troubles and Americans are still feeling the effects of the Wall Street Crash. It’s an interesting novel and the excitement of the newspapers announcing gambling being legalised and the Empire State Building going to open up comes across well in the writing.

Eddie is found to be not well after being involved in a crash and everything changes after his death. She finds herself in a police station being questioned and accused of killing him, either herself or contracted someone to do it for her. It adds to the intrigue.

Georgina is from Scotland, but moved to America and then starts over again in Heraklion, Crete. The words flow well as she travels by boat and there’s more to be learnt about Georgina. That time for the travelling and the getting to know characters is creatively used.

The positioning in politics and changing culture for Crete is fascinating and also told well. This isn’t a heavy read, which is good. It gently informs within conversations with Elena as the story moves along. I like this way of doing it a lot.

Georgina is introduced to Stelios Balaskas, who teaches at a school and is in a relationship with Georgina. This could perhaps have been written a bit more to allow development for the lead-up. What happens after is stronger writing.

The outbreak of war and the opinions that the characters are given is very readable and I get the feeling that good, solid research has been done and what impresses, is the natural flow of conversations from the characters. It’s interesting reading about the war from the point of view of people living within a different country to that of the UK and there’s a great sense of looking into a different country ie the UK from an outsider – Crete and what is seen as well as what is happening within Crete. It’s like a very grown-up, matter-of-fact conversation that just flows easily from page to page. The connections between what was happening between Greece, Turkey and Italy is fascinating.
The weaving of fact and fiction during the times in Crete is exceptional! It could have been heavy and sluggish, but instead it has a natural flow and is interesting and moves onwards at a decent pace and is intelligently written.

Georgina then meets Captain Hoeness and things get ever more serious and tight as the forces, deployed in Stalingrad are surrounded by the Red Army and then there’s the issue of what Italy may do. It’s all rather gripping as it goes on and there’s also an abduction plan… you’ll need to read on to discover if fears of removing someone from power leaves a vacuum or not.

With there being a prisoner of war trying to escape, concentration camps, the Red Army; the author has clearly put in a lot of work to research what was happening within many countries. There’s great detail of what happened to prisoners when Germany and their allies started to lose their grip and in what started to happen after the end of the war and it emerges even more that not everyone is who they once appeared to be. There is also what happened next when civil war broke out and the fear of both Germany on the far right and Russia on the far left and what they may do with Greece and Crete. There is intrigue as to if Erich has committed war crimes or not. The interest continues to the end in what is a fascinating book.
I recommend Georgina and I would think people who enjoy espionage and war stories or books set around Greece would enjoy this one.
If you enjoy Victoria Hislop’s books then give Georgina a try.

Great Book Festivals in 2019 – Final 2019 Blog Post #BookFestival #BloodyScotland #MorecambeVice #bookish #wrapup2019

Great Book Festivals in 2019
Final Blog Post of 2019

 

Bloody Scotland Torchlight Procession

I went to Bloody Scotland. This festival takes place annually in September, in Stirling across a few venues, most notably – The Golden Highland Hotel and The Royal Albert Halls. It attracts top authors and those debuting or looking for a festival to pitch their book ideas. It is lots of fun and an amazing and friendly experience in such a compact city.
I went to see Richard Osman from Pointless and House of Cards tv fame (look out for his crime fiction book The Thursday Murder Club in autumn 2020) and Mark Billingham. His latest book is – Their Little Secret. Full review is on my blog. I am looking forward to his book and hoping he returns to Bloody Scotland in 2020. I thank again, Richard Osman for the quick and nice chat and Mark Billingham for signing my book and for a nice chat.

I also saw Ian Rankin, who is also very good and very interesting, talking about his latest Rebus Book – In a House of Lies. I thank Ian Rankin again for the quick chat.
There is also a torchlight parade, which I took part in.
In 2018, I saw the author M.C. Beaton – author of Hamish Macbeth, Agatha Raisin and many others and actor Ashley Jensen – tv credits include Agatha Raisin, Love, Lies and Records, Ugly Betty and much more.
It attracts many, many more authors and their website and brochure is always worth checking out. This is a popular festival, so it is worth seeing who is on relatively early as tickets do sell out.
I had such a great time, so had to go back in 2019.
I look forward to returning to Bloody Scotland in 2020 and seeing who the authors will be.

My review of Richard Osman with Mark Billingham can be found on my blog.

I was invited back to Morecambe and Vice Crime Book Festival to review the entire weekend of amazing panels and had a thoroughly enjoyable time. This festival attracts an array of authors and speakers to Morecambe and is quirky, fun, interesting and informative. It even attracted a podcast. The authors varied from children’s authors to YA to adult fiction and non-fiction. There were talks about festivals and what it takes to set them up and the different types. There were topical talks about mental health too. I saw so many authors that it would be quite some list to mention them all, but there are blog posts about each of them in each panel within my blog.
I went first of all in 2018 after a conversation with actor and writer Hugh Fraser. It’s a long story… So, moving on, I was excited when I was invited by the organisers Ben and Tom to return. I look forward to seeing who the panels will be in 2020.
This is a newer and growing festival which is becoming established and making a name for itself, so is worth checking out.
Full reviews of each panel can be found on my blog.

So these are great festivals that will still be around in 2020 that are worthwhile checking out.

I have, before my blog began been to other book festivals, such as Edinburgh and Harrogate, which are also great, but the two I have written about here are the most recent and the festivals I have been to and they are the 2 I have attended whilst writing my blog.

I wish you all a Happy New Year and all the best for 2020. Thank you to all for following my blog. There are more exciting reviews from books to stage and more, to come in 2020, which I hope you will also enjoy and be inspired by. Thanks too for all the organisers and authors, speakers for making these experiences possible.

Review of Hands Up by Stephen Clark @StephCWrites @widopublishing #crimefiction #mystery #fiction #BlackLivesMatter #BlueLivesMatter #journalist #Review

Hands Up
by Stephen Clark
Rated 5 stars *****

About the Author

Stephen Clark is a former award-winning journalist who served as a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times and as a politics editor for the D.C. bureau of FoxNews.com.

As a reporter for the Utica Observer-Dispatch, he won a New York Newspaper Publishers Association Award of Distinguished Community Service for his investigation into the financial struggles of non-profit service. He also won a Society of Professional Journalists Award for Investigative Reporting at the Stamford Advocate.

Stephen is also the author of critically acclaimed Citizen Kill, which explores the dangers of Islamophobia through a government conspiracy to end the domestic war on terror…

Stephen grew up in the suburbs of Philadelphia and now lives in North Jersey with his wife and son. He has a bachelor’s degree in communications from Arcadia University and a master’s degree in journalism from Syracuse University.

Hands up cover

Blurb

Officer Ryan Quinn, a rookie raised in a family of cops, is on the fast track to detective until he shoots an unarmed black male. Now with his career, reputation and freedom on the line, he embarks on a quest for redemption that forces him to confront his fears and biases and choose between conscience or silence.

Jade Wakefield is an emotionally damaged college student living in one of Philadelphia’s worst neighbourhoods. She knows the chances of getting an indictment against the cop who killed her brother are slim. When she learns there’s more to the story that the official police account, Jade is determined, even desperate, to find out what really happened. She plans to get revenge by any means necessary.

Kelly Randolph, who returns to Philadelphia broke and broken after abandoning his family ten years earlier, seeks forgiveness whilst mourning the death of his son. But after he’s thrust into the spotlight as the face of the protest movement, his disavowed criminal past resurfaces and threatens to derail the family’s pursuit of justice.

Ryan, Jade and Kelly – three people from different worlds – are on a collision course after the shooting, as their lives interconnect and then spiral into chaos.

Hands up cover

Review

I was excited to be contact via my blog by Stephen Clark to review his book. He kindly sent me a physical copy from the USA (I am based in the UK) and told me a little about his book. This piqued my interest because it is about issues that are still being talked about and happening now. With him being a journalist (and award-winning), I figured he would really know what he was talking about. I am honoured that after coming across my blog that he has chosen me to review for him. This has not in any way swayed my opinion of his book. My review is not biased.

From the first few lines of readers know what has happened. This book focuses on the aftermath of a shooting. I like that. It really works for this book as instantly Officer Ryan Quinn is met and clearly not only trying to convince himself he is not a murderer, but also the tone and the doubting himself is so convincing and brings a bit of humanity to him and instant intrigue as to what really went on, on the fatal day he shot an unarmed black man, but felt his life was in enough jeopardy at the time. I like that it isn’t quite a simple as that. There are complexities to this story that has a black man shot in traffic. It gives a realism to the story.

The book alternates its chapters to bring each character into the story. This really works. The first is Ryan, who then gets interviewed about the incident. The second introduces Jade who has just broken up with her boyfriend and works in Mac’s Tavern and comes across the police and shot man. There is Kelly, who readers meet a little later, who hopes to reunite with his family. It’s well laid out and instantly readers can get a feel for the main characters and the story. It soon becomes clear how all their own lives are interconnected.

Officer Ryan’s world is turned upside down. He was supposed to be planning his wedding to Kaylee, his career was being fast-tracked and now things were not looking so rosy for his present or future.

The contrast between Ryan Quinn, Jade and Kelly is brilliantly done as there is the story from the officer’s point of view, but also his life out of work and then there is the story from Jade’s point of view – the one that even in the UK, we are becoming accustomed to seeing on the news with what happens in the US with the press being around wanting to know what happened and people wanting justice for the person who was shot. Then there’s Kelly’s who shows the scene, again one that we all see on our tv screens of what has now become sadly becoming known as “the usual reaction” and similar, with the prayer vigils, teddy’s, flowers, candles.

The book continues with a shooting of the cop’s house and depicts, what sadly seems to be the cycle of revenge by violence, that is just as sad as the death of Tyrell.

The chapters with Officer Ryan in therapy are also very poignant and adds depth to his character.

Part Two of the book takes the story to the aftermath of the trial of Ryan Quinn. The format is the same as part 1 and there is still the emotion, but the story takes the characters even further and there are some unexpected turns of events and I was still hooked, as I am sure others will be too. This second and final part is as well written and as well-paced as the first part. The twists and turns keeps it all going very well and it has a good, well-written ending.

The book gives a great insight into the aftermath of American life when a shooting happens and the lives of people. There is a depth throughout this book, with issues people face, lives being complicated. There is emotion and characters to care about. This story is one that I feel anyone reading it will want to read to the end to see how it all concludes. I certainly did. It is an absorbing book and one that I didn’t want to put down.

Whether readers are American or not, this is an important and thought-provoking story that Stephen Clark is telling. I really get the sense that he is telling it like it is. News like this is sometimes international, so no matter where you live in the world, there will be recognisable parts. There will be some parts of the story that are just part and parcel of the character’s day-to-day lives may also be relatable to people, wherever they live. The book, although fiction, fits in well with current affairs from all the different angles.

The book would be great for everyone to read and would be one that would be very good for a book group too as it would really spark conversation about the subject matter raised within this book (so long as it didn’t get too heated of course as civil conversations are always best).

Links:

Click here for Stephen Clark’s Website

Click here for Stephen Clark’s Twitter

Review of First in the Fight – 20 Women Who Made Manchester Rated 5 stars @inostalgiauk @HelenAntrobus #AndrewSimcock @LoveBooksGroup #Manchester #Scotland #UK #History #Review #BlogTour #Non-Fiction #Culture #Political #Nature #Social

First in the Fight – 20 Women Who Made Manchester
By Helen Antrobus and Andrew Simcock
Rated:5 stars *****

 

I am delighted and very excited to be part of this blog tour for the People’s History Museum for their book – The First in the Fight. Expertly put together by the historian and author Helen Antrobus and Andrew Simcock, this book celebrates women who yes, are important to Manchester, but in-turn, also made a huge impact on the UK as a whole, which we still see today. So, whether you are in Manchester or elsewhere, please do take time to find out what this book is actually all about. It covers more than you would think in the lovely short sections that are just a few pages long. They certainly keep the interest going and that want to read on.

Click here for a link: Nostalgia

Click here for a link for blog tour organiser

Blurb

Emmeline Pankhurst stands proudly in St Peter’s Square, but she stands for so many more… From the women who marched to St Peter’s Fields flying the flag for reform to the first entrepreneurs, the women of Greater Manchester have long stood shoulder to shoulder in the fight for equality and social change. For the centenary of some women being able to vote in 2018, the journey began for a statue to be erected, symbolising the incredible lives and achievements of Manchester’s radical women. Glimpse at the lives of the twenty women who were long-listed in the campaign, who all made Manchester first in the fight for freedom, and feminism.

Manchester Women Cover

Review

Behold these women who stood up for women’s rights. Some for the right to vote, others for workers rights and there are other women who inspire for other reasons as well.

This beautiful book important, influential women who have made a great impact, not just in Manchester, but across the entire UK, your mind may turn to the Pankhursts. The book does cover them, but there are also women who have done great things, who are less known or in the midst of time have been largely forgotten about, with their being at least one, almost being erased from history altogether.

This is a book I would recommend to anyone wanting to know more about social and political history and the women’s lives who were part of change or achieved great things that weren’t within the political sphere too. That’s what is so great here, is the variety of women who are showcased in this book.
The book nicely starts off with a very interesting bit about Manchester and its history before taking each individual women and allowing readers to learn something about who they were and who they became. It certainly is a valuable book full of substance. It is beautifully presented in the way it is written, with each woman just having a just few pages about them. It is also very well illustrated from the cover right down to the pages inside. Even the front cover seems fitting and eye-catching.

Let me take you on a short journey in tim to whet your appetite for reading this book.

The women who have been so well researched for this book are:

  1. Margaret Downes – read about her; discover what happened to her and Peterloo and some other, perhaps more prominent women who would have been around too.
  2. Margaret Ashton – a leading lady from Lancashire who was in the fight for equality and yet later had her name all but erased for quite some time. Find out how her name resurfaced and about her upbringing that brought her perhaps to the Suffrage movement.

  3. Mary Quaile – Born in Dublin, her family and her moved to Manchester and were from a poor working class background. Read about the her and other women who tried for equality in the workplace. Find out more about these women and the TUC here.

  4. Esther Roper – An orphan, she was one of the first women to attend Robert Owen’s College. Scots would know him for championing worker’s rights at New Lanark (now a great museum). She also wanted to continue where Lydia Becker left off (mentioned further below). Delve further into this part and you’ll find out more about her and her connections with suffragettes.

  5. Ellen Wilkinson – one of the first women to be voted into parliament and is also famous for leading the Jarrow March. Read her section to find out how she ended up in parliament and a bit about her life as a child and her death.

  6. Lydia Becker – largely forgotten in the tides of history, she had sympathies with the working class and also wrote a book about the suffragettes and set up a literary society with the focus on science. There’s much to be discovered in this part about her.

  7. Christabel Pankhurst – The Pankhursts played host to many reformers such as Keir Hardie from Scotland, William Morris – the English textile designer, activist etc and many more people, who you can discover in the book. There’s interesting bits about the relationship between Christabel and Emmeline to find out too.

  8. Sylvia Pankhurst – she had artistic and political leanings and led an interesting life in both her achievements and how family relations were with her.

  9. Emmeline Pankhurst – Perhaps not the first in the fight for women, but perhaps one of the most well-known and influential women to fight to gain the vote. There are snippets here and there however that perhaps you may or may not already know, so it’s still worth reading.

  10. Elizabeth Gaskell – One of the most influential authors of her time who also became acquainted to other well-known authors such as Charles Dickens and Charlotte Bronte. There are other parts of her life however that is perhaps less well-known and yet also fascinating, such as charitable work, other people who she met and life in general that aren’t so well-known.

  11. Enriqueta Rylands – she came across to Manchester from Cuba, other women shouted louder, so sadly she is sometimes overlooked and yet she is just as important. She was the founder of the John Ryland’s Library (perhaps a bit more well-known than herself as it is now a world landmark for literary lovers and historians. The library still exists today). Read more in this section about how she came to being in the UK, the overshadowing and her legacy to the world.

  12. Annie Horniman – she certainly lived a varied life and not one that would instantly spring to mind. Expect the somewhat unexpected here. There are many parts to her life that are very worth reading and is written in such a way that you would really get a good impression of what this woman was like.

  13. Olive Shapley – She presented Women’s Hour in the 1930’s (a radio 4 programme that still runs today) and created a safe house for women. There’s even more to this woman than meets the eye and some of it quite risky for the time. So read on to find out more about this pioneering woman.

  14. Marie Stopes – she fought for birth control and more. She, however, is a controversial woman who had (perhaps unfortunately) eugenics firmly in her sights and more can be found out in the book.

  15. Shena Simon – she championed for better education and active citizenship (however it was Ellen Wilkinson who was the first Minister of Education in 1945), but she nevertheless seemed to do quite a lot, which can be discovered in her part.

  16. Kathleen Ollerenshaw – one of the greatest mathematicians in the country (UK), she advocated for a lot educationally and died in 2014. There’s so much of her life that would have been, perhaps unknown until now…

  17. Louise  Da-Cocodia – the section starts with a great sounding African proverb, before moving onto her time within the NHS and being part of the “windrush” generation and creating a legacy.

  18. Elizabeth Raffald – long before Mary Berry and Nadia Hussain and lots of other people who you can think of today who are bakers, there was Elizabeth Raffald. A woman who was making waves in the business world and unbeknown to her she has left a legacy, of which more can be read about as well as a bit about her life.

  19. Emily Williamson – She was passionate about the conservation and preservation of wildlife. Her passion really shines through and I she would fit well in today’s most influential conservationists etc such as David Attenborough and Chris Packham. Her life is different from that from the social campaigners and worth reading to uncover more.

  20. Sunny Lowry – She swam the Channel. Again different from the social or political activists, but it shows women can do this and also take a moment to read this section as this isn’t just about achieving swimming the Channel (although impressive in itself), this is about much more that came into being afterwards.

To conclude, this is absolutely a fascinating book to read a really worthwhile getting. There are so many interesting parts that aren’t specifically about the women mentioned too, such as how it came about that there would be a statue for Emmeline Pankhurst and the work that went into that. There are well presented photos of this too, which were taken in very recent times. I highly recommend this book for anyone to read.

Manchester Women Cover

Happy Halloween – A message and fun facts #Halloween #UK #USA #Family #Education #Article

Halloween pic

Happy Halloween and Fun Facts

I hope that if you do something for Halloween, that you enjoy it. Stay safe and have fun and enjoy any treats you get for your efforts of dressing up/taking the children round doors, singing songs, telling a story or a joke. Remember to be nice to people and they’ll be nice and more tolerant back.

In Scotland we call it guising, although increasingly, like so many things, it is now being very Americanised and also called sometimes Trick or Treating. In a world that is becoming increasingly challenging to be in, spread some kindness and fun across this Halloween.

Fun Facts about Halloween:

 

  • The word “witch” comes from the Old English wicce, meaning “wise woman.” In fact, wiccan were highly respected people at one time. According to popular belief, witches held one of their two main meetings, or sabbats, on Halloween night.

 

  • “Souling” is a medieval Christian precursor to modern-day trick-or-treating. On Hallowmas (November 1), the poor would go door-to-door offering prayers for the dead in exchange for soul cakes.

 

  • Trick-or-treating evolved from the ancient Celtic tradition of putting out treats and food to placate spirits who roamed the streets at Samhain, a sacred festival that marked the end of the Celtic calendar year.

 

  • According to tradition, if a person wears his or her clothes inside out and then walks backwards on Halloween, he or she will see a witch at midnight.

 

  • Jack O’Lanterns were originally made from turnips.