#HappyNewYear #2023. Here are a number of #Fiction and #NonFiction Books in many genres I highly #Recommend from #2022 #BookRecommendations #BookReviews #BookWrap

I have reviewed many books in 2022 and what a privilege it has been too. Here are some that I highly recommend out of the many books I have reviewed in 2022. I also have included links to my full no spoiler reviews where you’ll also find the blurbs. The mix of crime fiction, contemporary fiction, historical fiction, non-fiction, memoirs are in no particular order. Please also feel free to explore my blog for other great book reviews, author interviews and talks and theatre reviews.

The Little Shop of Hidden Treasures By Holly Hepburn – An antique shop, antiques, a mysterious puzzle box, a trip to Egypt, a mention of the Canarvon Family (think the real Downton Abbey), all wrapped up in a wonderful book full of splendid characters.
Holly Hepburn has a new book coming this year that I will also be reviewing.

Check out the blurb and my review in the link: The Little Shop of Hidden Treasures

Suicide Thursday By Will Carver explores this and the darker corners of society. It’s a compulsive read with intriguing characters – Mike, Jackie and Eli. Will Eli leave a hated job and get past writing chapter 1 of a novel? What is written in texts? Find out the answers to these and more in Suicide Thursday.

Link to blurb and review –Suicide Thursday

All About Evie By Matson Taylor is a humorous second book to the much talked about The Miseducation of Evie Epworth that was a Radio 2 book club pick. There’s much humour mixed with poignancy and sadness. Find out what happens at a sound check at Broadcasting House, her friend, Caroline and life’s mishaps and incidents. It’s highly engaging. Find the blurb and review in the link: All About Evie

Yes, I Killed Her By Harry Fisher s full of chilling suspense. The question isn’t who, but it is how. How did a murderer commit such a calculated crime. Is it as perfect as he thinks? Here is a link to the blurb and full review. Remember, I’m not going to disclose the answers to those questions. That’s for you to discover yourselves: Yes, I Killed Her

Verity Vanishes By A.B. Morgan is book 3 of The Quirk Files. The books can be read as part of the series or as standalone as the cases each complete by the end of the book. The Quirks are quirky private investigators.

There are secrets to uncover, including who was Verity, why has she vanished and why is a tv station so interested in this particular case? It’s intriguing with wit. See blurb and review in the link –Verity Vanishes

Touching, haunting and a darn good unputdownable read. It takes place between Glasgow and H.M. Polmont Prison in Central Scotland. It’s gripping getting to know about what revelations unfold in Ginger and Wendy’s personalities and what happens to them. It’s a book of obsession and friendship and more in this contemporary fictional book… Find out more in the link to the blurb and my full review: Ginger And Me

The Homes By J.B. Mylet is set in an orphanage village in Scotland. Follow the lives of Lesley, Jonesy and Eadie, all from their points of views. How safe is The Homes? Murder strikes and everything changes in this fast-paced, immersive page-turner. It’s fiction based on a true story. Find out more in the link: The Homes

Remember Me by Charity Norman is gripping and addictive as the layers build up to discover what has happened to Leah, who has disappeared.

The book also follows Felix, who has Alzheimer’s. It’s authentically and sensitively written. Discover the blurb and the rest of my thoughts in the link: Remember Me

Should I Tell You By Jill Mansell is enthralling in both setting and the relationships between all the characters. Meet Lachlan, a chef in high demand and Peggy, a formidable, yet fun woman who puts up a credible argument as to why he should follow her to Cornwall to cook his amazing food. Also meet Amber, Lachlan, Rafaelle and Vee as you step into idyllic scenery. Is all well though? What would you make of the mysterious letter? Find out more in my link about this beautiful, compelling book that perfectly captures the lives of its characters, who are concealing truths. Should I Tell You

White Christmas on Winter Street has all the festive feel-good vibes you can want. Unearth the treasures in Corner House in Middledip. It’s a rather moving book as Heather returns to discover new friends and old. Find out more in the link: White Christmas on Winter Street

The Little Wartime Library By Kate Thompson is about a courageous librarian who took Bethnal Green Library underground during World War 2. It is fascinating and is fiction based on fact. Lots of research was done, including asking librarians, including me, many questions that then formed the basis of the central character. The Little Wartime Library

The Locked Away Life by Drew Davies is about 2 people who are seemingly poles apart. 1 is becoming practically a recluse and increasingly elderly, the other, much younger in need of a job, which is how they meet. Little do they know they need each other more than they thought they would. It’s a heartwarming story. Find out more in the link: The Locked AwayLife

Love Untold by Ruth Jones is uplifting, emotional and endearing, It crosses the generations from a teenager right up to a 90 year old. It’s well observed in all the complexities of life and interactions.
Discover more such as the blurb and my review in the link. Love Untold

The Cliff House by Chris Brookmyre puts readers on an island. There’s a hen party set on a Scottish island. In some ways it’s a bit like And Then There We’re None by Agatha Christie, but there are also many differences.

There are frictions amongst the guests and things take a sinister turn. It’s a well-observed book in the way relationships are between the characters and what happens when people are on a remote island. Everyone has a secret and no one is safe. Find out more in the blurb and the rest of my thoughts in the review: The Cliff House

Cat Lady By Dawn O’Porter is very humorous but also very poignant and thought provoking. Within the book, wrapped in the cuteness of a cat, there is a great human story too and both together makes this quite different and compelling. There are 5 parts to Cat Lady – Mother, Career Woman, Animal, Wife, Cat Lady. Follow Mia and Tristan through the ups and downs of life. Mia is especially more than you would perhaps assume she is… Here is the link to the blurb and full review: Cat Lady

Thrown is a debut novel by Sara Cox. It’s heartwarming and uplifting at a pottery class. It’s about community pulling together and friendships forming. There are elements that may well tug at your heartstrings. Here is the link to the blurb and review: Thrown

The Cruise by Catherine Cooper takes place on the most luxurious cruise-liner. The type that would be a holiday of a lifetime. Something mysterious happens and it is compelling to travel around to try to fit together all the pieces to discover how they all fit together and some truths. Here is the link to the blurb and full review. The Cruise

Keeping A Christmas Promise By Jo Thomas is about 4 friends who have known each other for 25 years. Tragedy happens to one of them, meaning it is up to 3 of them to keep their bucketlist promise- to see the northern lights at Christmas. With themes of friendship, mortality and strength to carry on in the face of adversity and community, it’s an entertaining, heartwarming book. Here is the link to the blurb and full review. Keeping A Christmas Promise

The Echoes of Love By Jenny Ashcroft transports readers to the 1930’s to the 1940’s and then to 1970’s. It takes readers into the depths of love and war and how it reverberates years later. The book is set between Portsmouth in the UK and Crete. It is a story of war and love. A story unfolding at the BBC Broadcasting House. It is fascinating, poignant and beautifully written. Here is the link to my original review and the blurb. The Echoes of Love

Cooking the Book by various authors published by Hobeck Books also raised money for the Trussell Trust. It’s various short stories, each taking on a different sub-genres of crime fiction. Each also has a recipe you can create by each author. Here is the link to all the details Cooking The Books

The Language of Food is fiction based on fact. It takes reader into the life of a little known woman, by many, called Eliza Acton. She changed the course of cookery forever and when today’s cooks come across her, they are inspired by her story and style and have been influenced greatly by her. Annabel Abbs now opens up her life in this very interesting book. Here is the link to discover more: The Language of Food

Create Your Own Indoor Green by Joe Swift who is also an expert gardener on Gardeners World and various other programmes. The book is an easy step by step guide to indoor plants. It quite literally has everything you need to know, whether you’re getting started or already have indoor plants as there’s always more knowledge to be gained. There are handy hints and tips as well as growing and caring for them. I actually bought this for a friend after reviewing it and she is delighted. Find out the blurb and review in the link: Joe’s Create Your Own Indoor Green

Women Like Us By Amanda Prowse, is a memoir where she sheds light and insight into her life, which many women will be able to relate to or understand, perhaps more than they may first expect. It’s a highly interesting read.
Women Like Us

One Night on The Island introduces readers to Cleo. She works for the magazine – Women Today and has an unusual assignment to do. Directed by her boss, Ali, the assignment is to marry herself (or self-coupling or sologamy) on a remote island. She has a few reservations to say the least. It’s an entertaining story with lots of heart and warmth. One Night On the Island

Mothers and Daughters By Erica James is a compelling story of family life and revelations. Families can be more complex than what they may first appear to be in this sweeping family drama. Mothers and Daughters

Marion Crawford, a bright, ambitious young teacher, is ready to make her mark on the world. Until a twist of fate changes the course of her life forever…
This mixes fact and fiction with Marion and the UK Royal Family in a fascinating way, about a woman not everyone knows much about. The Good Servant

Wolf Pack By Will Dean is a Scandi-Noir.

Tuva Moodyson has a case on her hands to solve with Thord and Chief Björn.
Elsa Nyberg is reported as being missing and chillingly, Rose Farm has quite the history of deadly things happening there, involving a family. It’s a gripping page-turner. Here is the link to the full review and blurb. Wolf Pack

The Empire By Michael Ball is exquisitely theatrical, after all, that is his background. It takes readers back in time to the glitz and glamour of 1922, where you’ll meet Jack Tredwell and a whole host of other cast. There are secrets and the future of the theatre itself is in jeopardy. It’s a page turner! Here’s my link to the blurb and rest of the review The Empire

Advertisement

#Review By Lou of Suicide Thursday By Will Carver will_carver @OrendaBooks @RandomTTours #Thriller #Fiction #SuicideThursday #BookReview #readingcommunity #writingcommunity

Suicide Thursday
By Will Carver

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Today, I have a later than planned (due to circumstance the publisher and blog tour organiser are aware about and have been kind) review of  Suicide Thursday; the latest book by Will Carver. It is pitch perfect and dark, with just enough light to show readers another glimpse into society’s darker images, darker thoughts and realities and yet it is incredibly compelling and a page turner… Discover more in the blurb and then my other thoughts about Thursdays and more pertinently, the book in my review. Thanks first to Random T.Tours and Orenda Books for the invite to review. 

If words could kill…
 
Eli Hagin can’t finish anything.
 
He hates his job, but can’t seem to quit. He doesn’t want to
be with his girlfriend, but doesn’t know how end things with
her, either. Eli wants to write a novel, but he’s never taken a
story beyond the first chapter.
 
Eli also has trouble separating reality from fiction.
When his best friend kills himself, Eli is motivated, for the first
time in his life, to finally end something himself, just as Mike
did…
 
Except sessions with his therapist suggest that Eli’s most
recent ‘first chapters’ are not as fictitious as he had intended
… and a series of text messages that Mike received before his
death point to something much, much darker
 

Review

Will Carver is known for dark and twisty plots than show those darker corners of society and this doesn’t disappoint. If you’re looking for something so unique and a page turner with a plot that lingers in your heart, mind and soul afterwards, Will Carver is your man. It is often thrilling to see an invite to review these books and then to see where the plot takes you and if this look into parts of society not really written about like this, can be pulled off again. Turns out the author absolutely has managed to again. First I want to say something about Thursdays in general and then onto the book.

Turns out Thursdays are days I might take to hibernation. They used to be one of the great days of the week, more or less  predictable, but safe. Now, however it don’t seem as wise to step outside as they once were. There are certain crime books and thrillers that now specifically happen on a Thursday and this is one of them. It makes me wonder if I can get all those authors together to persuade my employer I should have every Thursday off and then a Friday as a bonus to celebrate the fact I survived the Thursday…

Now onto the book…

Suicide Thursday hits you deep in the heart and yet compels you to read on. The intermittent text messages are as stark as an arrow going through your body. There is Jackie who is quite religious, then there is Eli, whom she knows cannot finish anything he starts. Readers of the book are privy to see what he begins to write in the book he has began. There’s also Mike who is also very troubled and having a hard time in life.
As a reader and observer to the characters lives, I found myself increasingly pulled in by the interesting dialogue and thought processes of the characters, especially in texts and in a chat room with a person whom is known as fake therapist, that truly stand out and enhance the storytelling. It is poignant and thought provoking. The deeper you go, beyond the superficial and any day to day life, the darker it becomes and the more there is to discover about how Thursdays are and why the book is called Suicide Thursday and without the book being in distinctive parts, life before and after Mike’s death are revealed. It becomes apparent that there is more to be uncovered about what Eli will do, whether he will continue with therapy or not and whether he will finish his book or not and just how will it all end?…

#Spotlight and #Reviews on Bloody Scotland Author – Will Carver @will_carver @BloodyScotland #BloodyScotland @Brownlee_Donald @OrendaBooks #Blogtour

I am incredibly excited to be on the blog tour for Bloody Scotland 2022 to tell you about Will Carver and Joanne Harris. This post will be shining a huge spotlight on Will Carver and a further one will inform you about Joanne Harris in a separate post. You can find links to where you can book tickets, details about the event, the blurb and review and a bit about the author, but let me tell you a little about the festival first.

Bloody Scotland turns an stunning 10 years old this year and is more than established itself as a firm favourite of Crime Authors and Readers in Stirling. This year it is kicking off from Thursday 15th running to Sunday 18th September 2022. This amazing festival brings Stirling to life with fabulous venues at The Golden Lion Hotel, The Albert Halls and The Tolbooth, all on close proximity of each other.

Will Carver is published by Indy publisher Orenda Books and specialises in psychological crime thrillers, where each book is as gripping as the last. These are books that I highly recommend every adult should have on their bookshelves and in their hands. More about my thoughts after what you can expect from the panel: Twisted, starring Sarah Pinborough, Will Carver, Harriet Tyce.

The Event – Twisted

Saturday 17th September 4:30 pm5:30 pm
Golden Lion Hotel, Kings Street, Stirling

There are twists and there are twisted twists. These three authors are devilishly skilled in the dark arts of deception. Sarah Pinborough’s mesmerising Insomnia is an unsettling thriller about a lack of sleep and spiralling paranoia, but it’s spiced with dark undercurrents of something entirely different. Will Carver’s latest off-the-wall thriller The Daves Next Door almost defies description, suffice to say it’s wildly original, shocking, deliciously dark, and like nothing you’ve read before. The pulsating It Ends at Midnight by Harriet Tyce twists and turns like a corkscrew as revenge and murder stalk a lavish New Year’s party in Edinburgh. The event will be chaired by Paul Burke of Crime Time FM. 

For A Ticket Click Here

Blurb

A disillusioned nurse suddenly learns how to care.

An injured young sportsman wakes up find that he can see only in black and white.

A desperate old widower takes too many pills and believes that two angels have arrived to usher him through purgatory.

Two agoraphobic men called Dave share the symptoms of a brain tumour, and frequently waken their neighbour with their ongoing rows.

Separate lives, running in parallel, destined to collide and then explode.

Like the suicide bomber, riding the Circle Line, day after day, waiting for the right time to detonate, waiting for answers to his questions: Am I God? Am I dead? Will I blow up this train?

Shocking, intensely emotive and wildly original, Will Carver’s The Daves Next Door is an explosive existential thriller and a piercing examination of what it means to be human … or not. 

Review
⭐️ ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I have long been a fan of Will Carver and make no secret of this, ever since Nothing Important Happened Today landed in my hands to review on my blog and have been reading his books ever since. His latest book is The Daves Next Door. He reflects the deepest, darkest corners of society; often twisted; sometimes deploying a clever reverse psychology technique; always with  weaving fiction with great observational truths about society; always thought-provoking and always intensely gripping. I start his books as early in the day as I possibly can because once started, they are very hard to put down.

Here is what I thought of his latest book – The Daves Next Door and feel free to check out the links afterwards to some of the other reviews I’ve written on my blog.

Darkly thought-provoking as Will Carver’s books are; The Daves Next Door is another highly unique, shockingly plausible thriller.

The events within the book, as it says near the start, are pretty close to the truth, but are actual fictional. There are many stories in the universe, big ones and small ones and this is shown within this book and majestically points this out in a captivating way, right from the prologue. The book isn’t really about that terrorist attack at all, it’s about insights and observations of society. It isn’t your typical thriller with such characters as is within the blurb, with death, blood, guts and gore. It’s more a cerebral, psychological thriller; which is where Will Carver’s books tend to settle in.

This book packs a punch! Will Carver and his bravery of saying things how they are in excellent story-telling that captivates until the very end, meaning for many a late night reading one of his books. What Will Carver expertly does is shows the consequence and the aftermath of an event. The events are explosively shocking! People who didn’t initially know each other now have a connection. He has taken a different angle starting with the prologue and then ingeniously finishes the prologue on a question, so how can you not be enticed to read on?

Then the book takes readers to the Daves. They are terribly unwell, both psychologically and physically, but there is some unexpected optimism in tone at certain times.

The book shows a little about being in a life or death scenario and the human condition. There’s an old man and the Daves and a young sportsman who have of course been in better ways in their health and life. There’s also Vashiti, the nurse, who questions her ability to care, whether she actually does care and then re-learns this. There’s also a could be terrorist and what thoughts go on. There is also, intriguingly, some chapters called God? Terrorist? Narrator? – all 3 mentioned in the title, before splitting off a bit. It’s a very unique book and this poses a very different set of questions, compared to the Daves or the nurse.

There’s so much that is thought-provoking that makes you see things in different ways as the book takes readers on a journey into the human psyche. This is something Will Carver does rather expertly and then fictionalises it just enough to create an entrancing, yet very plausible story that shows elements of society and perhaps shows parts in a true light. He finds all the darker, often hidden in plain sight corners and reflects them back to the reader.
There are elements of themes and writing style that are reminiscent of Nothing Important Happened Today and Hinton Hollow Death Trip, but it is perfectly okay not to have read these first as The Daves Next Door is standalone. They all shine a light in the most original ways on society in storytelling that I certainly hadn’t seen before. So, if you need something to read that is entirely new, check out Will Carver’s books.

The Daves Next Door is compulsive and immersive reading. Like his other books, it provides great insight into the world and people’s minds, parts that aren’t particularly talked about, but are there, quietly existing amongst the earth today. Will Carver takes people out of the everyday thoughts and observations and gives a different, but still truthful, perspective on society. It’s yet another must read book. I know, I know, I’ve said this about every single book by Will Carver that I have read and reviewed, which is almost all of them, but it isn’t something I say lightly. Books by him go deep into your soul, are unforgettable and could, if everyone read them, have people having a deeper understanding, a deeper insight and perspective into society as well as thinking about their own lives, all in what are works of fiction, but a white-knuckle journey, close to the truth.

Feel free to click on the links of the titles of just a few of his previous books before I go on to tell you a bit about the man himself.

Nothing Important Happened Today      Hinton Hollow Death Trip     Psychopaths Anonymous

 

About Will Carver

Will Carver is the international bestselling author of the January David series. He spent his early years in Germany, but returned to the UK at age eleven, when his sporting career took off. He turned down a professional rugby contract to study theatre and television at King Alfred’s, Winchester, where he set up a successful theatre company. He currently runs his own fitness and nutrition company, and lives in Reading with his two children. Will’s latest title published by Orenda Books, The Beresford is out in July. His previous title Hinton Hollow Death Trip was longlisted for the Not the Booker Prize, while Nothing Important Happened Today was
longlisted for the Theakston’s Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Good
Samaritans was book of the year in Guardian, Telegraph and Daily Express, and hit number one on the ebook charts.

#Review Psychopath’s Anonymous By Will Carver @Will_Carver @OrendaBooks #WelcomeToTheClub #PsychopathsAnonymous #Thriller @RandomTTours

Psychopath’s Anonymous
By Will Carver

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Having read a few books by Will Carver now, you realise that as chilling the titles may be, there is often a point being made for the greater good of society that is compelling and to read in his thrillers. Psychopath’s Anonymous has got this too, through its dark tones. These may be some of this most important fictional books ever that never cease to amaze me.
Find out more in the blurb and my full review below.
Firstly, thanks to Random T. Tours for inviting me to review on the blog tour and Orenda Books for gifting me the book.

Psychopaths Anonymous

Blurb

When AA meetings make her want to drink more, alcoholic murderess Maeve sets up a group for psychopaths.
Maeve has everything. A high-powered job, a beautiful home, a string of uncomplicated one-night encounters.
She’s also an addict: a functioning alcoholic with a dependence on sex and an insatiable appetite for killing men.

When she can’t find a support group to share her obsession, she creates her own. And Psychopaths Anonymous is born. Friends of Maeve.

Now in a serious relationship, Maeve wants to keep the group a secret. But not everyone in the group adheres to the rules, and when a reckless member raises suspicions with the police, Maeve’s drinking spirals out of control. She needs to stop killing. She needs to close the group. But Maeve can’t seem to quit the things that are bad for her, including her new man…

Review

Psychopath’s Anonymous is a book where every word has strength in tone and matters so much that it grips every part of your being until the end, where it only loosens its grip every so slightly, but leaves part of its astonishing text and feeling/aura to live on within you.
The book is in 5 parts with some sentences written in a most unique way, with a score through them that holds so much poignancy and relevance. There is no detective, rather an exploration of part of society in fictional thriller form. Each part is cleverly separated into steps, like you find steps to recovery in a support group. This instantly sets up the story that unfolds. Will Carver invites readers into the h..ead of an addict and the inner sanctum of support groups, depicted by Maeve, who you enter into an AA meeting with and meet other addicts. It packs a punch! It tells a raw truth of various people sitting in this circle. The book is unique. Books don’t often have the same sentence typed out and then scored out. This one does, within its seering paragraphs about humanity and some people’s minds. It’s also about other addictions within society, such as social media, egos etc.
There is also the exploration in how people watch tv, especially the news (good versus bad news) and soaps. Then there is an even starker fact that lots of people watch reality tv. The sort where the unlikeliest of people are forced together to create entertainment. The book explores this in a way that it hasn’t been before. It could change perceptions on them and see them in a different light, or perhaps clarify what you perhaps already thought of them. It’s also an interesting way of showing how strangers are put together in what is perhaps unnatural situations, whether it be an AA group or a reality tv show, both showing egos, attitudes, behaviours in one way or another in the stories that are told or shown from lives lived.

The book delves into the mind and about God in a very matter-of-fact way and becomes a recurring theme throughout the book.
There is also an interesting part that splits a wider  into 3 types of addict too, showing that stepped programmes, thoughts go beyond AA meetings in some ways. It doesn’t question anyone’s motives or beliefs. What it does is make you see things in a different perspective. A psychopathic alcoholic’s manner of thoughts. It also has an instruction at the beginning of each step.  Maeve later creates her own group – Psychopath’s Anonymous. Like AA meetings, it has steps to support and give direction, but there are differences within those steps.

Maeve has a sponsor – Gary, who is in no doubt in a precarious position with her as warped, dark thoughts go through her mind, that takes you to the edge of your seat, whether you want to be pulled in that far or not. Sex is never far away, nor is alcohol, nor death that swirl around in this women’s mind and then on the other hand, nor is support and how it’s administered.  Then right when you don’t expect it, the book makes you cast your mind back to an earlier book – ‘Nothing Important Happened Today’; in one breath-taking moment! Certain things trickle through from Nothing Important Happens Today, such as an action, a character, an image (but take note, it is okay if you’ve not read this yet).

As the book goes on, readers find out more about who Maeve has harmed and what she has done. It’s written in a chilling fashion as it delves into her world and what it is to be a psychopath and how behaviours and thoughts are displayed. It looks like research has been done and isn’t like how some films portray a psychopath. There seems to be a lot of consideration to this, as well as encouraging people to examine other elements of society.

It’s an amazing book and one you’ll have to read to see what, if any, improvements are made within lives and see how it ends.

All books written by Will Carver leaves like a residue behind like no other. It seems that every book I’ve certainly read of his sticks for a very long time afterwards.

My Top Book Choices of 2020 by Lou #2020Reads #AdultFiction #CrimeFiction #Fiction #Thrillers #RomanticFiction #ContemporaryFiction #Uplit

My Top Book Choices of 2020
Various Authors

I have read and reviewed a huge amount of very good books. It has taken a lot of time and consideration to whittle them down to create the Top Book Choices List. All those that did not make this particular list, were incredibly close. I have added links so you can easily see what the books are about. The books are in no particular order. Look out for my top Adult Non-Fiction List and my top Children’s Fiction List, both are in separate posts.

Top Adult Fiction Books

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman Click Here for More Info

The Miseducation of Evie Epworth by Matson Taylor Click Here for More Info

Killing Rock by Robert Daws Click Here for More Info

Daughters of Cornwall by Fern Britton Click Here for More Info

What Lies Beneath by Adam Croft Click Here for More Info

Orfeia by Joanne M. Harris Click Here for More Info

Hinton Hollow Death Trip by Will Carver Click Here for More Info

Us Three by Ruth Jones Click Here for More Info

Perfume Paradiso by Janey Jones Click Here for More Info

The Things I Want To Say but Can’t by Carla Christian Click Here for More Info

The House of Correction by Nicci French Click Here for More Info

Tell  Me How It Ends by Isabelle Grey Click Here for More Info

The Colours by Juliet Bates Click Here for More Info

Miss Benson’s Beetle by Rachel Joyce Click Here for More Info

Letters From the Past by Erica James Click Here for More Info

One Step Behind by Lauren North Click Here for More Info

The Unravelling by Liz Treacher Click Here for More Info

Christmas With the Bobby Girls by Johanna Bell Click Here for More Info

The Secrets of Strangers by Charity Norman Click Here for More Info

The Strange Book of Jacob Boyce by Tom Gillespie Click Here for More Info

Butterflies by D.E. McCluskey Click Here for More Info

Contacts by Mark Watson Click Here for More Info

The Life We Almost Had by Amelia Henley Click Here for More Info

The Guest List by Lucy Foley Click Here for More Info

Summer on A Sunny Island by Sue Moorcroft Click Here for More Info

The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths Click Here for More Info

The Garden of Forgotten Wishes by Trisha Ashley Click Here for More Info

Lion Heart by Ben Kane Click Here for More Info

Deep Dark Night by Steph Broadribb Click Here for More Info

With Or Without You by Drew Davies Click Here for More Info