David Bowie by Robert Dimery #DavidBowie #Bookreview by Lou #LawrenceKingPublishing #NetGalley #NonFiction #Biography #Music

David Bowie
By Robert Dimery
Rated:
5 stars *****

Whether you are a seasoned fan of David Bowie or wanting an introduction to who he was, then this compelling book would make a great starting point or addition to anyone’s music collection.
Thanks to Lawrence King Publishing for accepting my request to review.
Read further to discover the blurb and the review in full.

David Bowie

Blurb

David Bowie was a restless innovator, scoring chart hits that broke radical new ground. His image changed with almost every album, influencing high streets and catwalks alike. He became an acclaimed actor, while his androgynous aura and ambiguous sexuality proved liberating to those uncertain about their own. This book charts his evolution in the sixties, his euphoric reinvention in 1972 as Ziggy Stardust and the excessive lifestyle that nearly cost him his sanity. It revisits his artistic rebirth in Berlin, the global stardom he achieved with Let’s Dance in 1983 and his triumphant farewell, Blackstar.

David Bowie is part of the Lives the Musicians series: highly readable short biographies of the most-popular musicians.

Review

A biography of David Bowie, I felt would be an ambitious book for anyone to pull off, there is after all, so much to say about him, but one that Robert Dimery has managed expertly to do, to make it an excellent introduction or addition to anyone’s musician book collection.

The contents page is enough to intrigue and scoop David Barlow fans up:

Becoming Bowie ♦ Of Mods and Mime ♦ Lift-off ♦ Rock ‘n’ Roll Alien ♦ Ziggy Goes To America ♦
Diamond Dogs and the Thin White Duke ♦ Berlin Calling ♦ Scary Monsters (and Superstardom) ♦
Losing the Muse ♦ Art-house Rules

This book is mature in writing. Let’s face it, writing about someone as elusive and yet as popular as David Bowie must have been an exciting opportunity, but very nicely it doesn’t feel like the author has hyped him up. He hasn’t shied away from, what must have been challenging times in David Bowie’s life of not being instantly loved and having to face some criticism. There are also the times, which must have been terrific, when things were going well. It feels very authentic and rounded.

The book, after a foreward, begins to tell you who David Bowie was as a man, the street he was on and a bit about his close family life and extended relatives and the atmosphere certain developments created. It captivates and gives a bit more understanding of David Bowie, away from the professional, famous persona he had. There are also other popstars of the time mentioned, which gives depth and all relates to David Bowie one way or another and bands he was part of. It is interesting reading about the eclectic music involved and performing on music shows such as Ready Steady Go, in his early career. There is also a look at the actual development of how he became a solo artist. There’s a nuanced exploration into sexuality that pops up every so often, like just reminding people how this influenced people and how people related to David Bowie. It is evident that a lot of David Bowie’s life has been researched and also the wider sphere of it, which creates fascination and in a way, perhaps readers will see something of themselves reflected back at them or remember the quotes from some famous fans, from the likes of NME.
It says about the uneasy start of Space Oddity, which these days, it’s hard to believe, but this is what the book shows, that the pop business isn’t as easy as it makes out to be. It has a truth about it, that even the most well-known had very challenging times. The book  rolls into Bowie’s alter-ego – Ziggy Stardust and what influenced certain music, such as his stage entrances. There are nuggets throughout the book, which is like a glimpse of behind the scenes and into the music business, as well as his own individuality, creating such a fascinating book. Going stateside is quite the eye-opener in terms of music, but even more so in the affect it had on himself and Angie. Later it talks of Iman and takes readers right up to Blackstar, where it is all quite emotional due to his death, and yet stay in keeping with the tone of the rest of the book, which is factual and has a professional, rather than over-excited fan, feel to it and that’s what helps keep it interesting, at times intriguing and most certainly compelling. It feels like this is okay to read because it seems to document how things are and there are some well-placed quotes, which brings David Bowie’s voice into the writing. It feels respectful. In the middle of the book, there are also some fabulous photos of David Bowie, documenting through his years of being a star, pictorially.
At the back, readers are treated to discography and further reading of live albums.

The Art of Creativity by Susie Pearl #BookReview by Lou @susie_pearl @orionspring @RandomTTours #NonFiction

The Art of Creativity
By Susie Pearl
Rated: 5 stars ****

About the Author

The Art of Creativity Susi_Pearl_press_shots-19-1024x684Susie Pearl is a writer, podcaster and a host of workshops on creative writing, visioning and meditation. She is a mentor and holistic coach for companies such as MTV, Huffington Post, Google and Sony. She is the author of Instructions for Happiness and Success (2012) and has been involved in writing and collaborating on international bestselling titles including The Art of Eating Well with Hemsley & Hemsley and contributed to research for Paul McKenna’s I Can Make You Rich. She is the founder of a celebrity PR agency in London, and lives between London and Ibiza. She hosts the Conversations with Susie Pearl podcast and is a cancer survivor.
You can follow Susie at:
Twitter: @susiepearl 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/susiepearlwriter                                             
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/susiepearlx     
Website: susiepearl.com

 

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Blurb

Discover the daily habits of highly creative people.
What do most highly creative people have in common? What are the habits they cultivate? What is
‘the flow’ and how do you get into it? THE ART OF CREATIVITY is a practical guide to help you unlock
your creative potential and find fulfilment and happiness in the process.
After 20 years working with some of the most creative people on the planet, writer and business
coach Susie Pearl has unearthed the habits of highly creative people and takes you on a journey to
unlock your own inner stream of creativity.
Over the course of this easy-to-follow guide, you will learn to take risks with your inner artist, ignore
critics, release blocks and get into daily creative habits in order to build better projects, ideas and
artistic collaborations, and unearth creative solutions and innovations.
Containing practical tools and exercises, and a step-by-step to help you along the way, THE ART OF
CREATIVITY will reveal a more fulfilled, passionate and creative you.

The Art of Creativity Front Cover

Review

This erudite book is well set out into 7 steps, or habits as she likes to call them, which have some of the hallmarks within them of perhaps being inspired by Paul McKenna and Richard Bandler, in that she is channeling creativity and showing how you can create the headspace to expand your creativeness in ways you may not realise. In saying that, it is also very much her own work. It is a reassuring book and reassuring that she clearly has learnt from the masters of this.

She cleverly and thoughtfully sets out what creativity is and also a bit about herself, so people can relate to her and the book from the beginning. It’s almost a gentle way of introducing herself and setting out the goals of the book.

It’s not just about the reading of the book, this is about getting yourself involved as there are easy to follow instructions, so you can interact and be on a path to a positive change in whatever that means to you. It’s a bit more involved than a simple positive thought. It is something that is thought-provoking and really gets you thinking about that postive change you want to make.

The explanations of each habit, such as overthinking etc, are short but useful. It’s clearly a book where the emphasis is on the doing, as it then takes readers by the hand to the exercise and a step-by-step guide of what to do and each is surprisingly acheivable. It feels like she really does want readers to have success in either small or large things and whatever your goal is, it’s important.

She talks through some common blocks to creativity and includes some real life examples, that may get readers looking into their own blocks and then she starts to break them down.

I find the book is matter of fact and she is very knowlegeable. The book feels safe and there is nothing complex about it. You can do it at your own pace and gradually inspiration may well come to readers. It has a good feeling about it. You don’t need to be super-rich either, just the cost of the book and paper or a journal and a pen or pencil is all the equipment you need.

She talks about the purpose and outcomes from the science of techniques such as meditation and the benefits in easy to follow language. It’s a good technique, so people can have a greater understanding of the reason why she is suggesting something, such as meditiation, before going into the guide as to how to do it effectively. There’s nothing scary about it, even when it comes to mind-mapping, which is possible some people could be a bit more unfamiliar with because it’s all explained in a way that treats readers like intelligent adults and yet almost holding their hands to guide them through.

The book nicely builds in self-care as well as looking forwards to the future. It appears to give readers validation and encouragement.

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Top 2020 Non-Fiction Book List by Lou #Non-Fiction #2020BookList #2020

Top 2020 Non-Fiction Books

I have had the pleasure of reading some great and very interesting non-fiction books throughout 2020. I am pleased to present my top 8 non-fiction books.

The Greatest Beer Run Ever by John Donohue Click Here for More Info

Eileen – The Making of George Orwell by Sylvia Topp Click Here for More Info

Shakespearean by Robert McCrum Click Here for More Info

To Be A Gay Man by Will Young – Click Here for More Info

Crow Glen – A Spiritual Universe of An Irish Village by Marella Hoffman Click Here for More Info

A Year of Living Simply by Kate Humble  Click Here for More Info

In Sat Nav We Trust by Jack Barrow Click Here for More Info

The Boy Between by Amanda Prowse and Josiah (Josh) Hartley Click Here for More Info




#BookReview by Lou of The Fear Talking – The True Story of a Young Man And Anxiety by Chris Westoby @ChrisWestoby @BarbicanPress #RandomThingsTours #health #wellbeing #mentalhealth #nonfiction

The Fear Talking – The True Story of a Young Man And Anxiety
By Chris Westoby
Rated: 4 stars ****

A day late due to technical issues outwith my control. Apologies…Today I’m delighted to close the blog tour of The Fear Talking. It is one that perhaps will resonate with people and for those of us who don’t have this anxiety within us, it is a good study and will people will be able to empathise.

About the Author

christopher Westoby

Author information: Chris Westoby has a PhD in Creative Writing at the
University of Hull, where he is now Programme Director of the Hull Online Creative
Writing MA. He guest lectures in subjects of mental health, teaches reflective writing
to Mental Health Nursing Students, and runs cross-faculty writing workshops. Chris
was born and raised in Barton, on the Lincolnshire side of the Humber, where he still
lives.

The Fear Talking Cover Image

Blurb

Chris knows he will never get over his anxiety. He didn’t
want a ‘How to get better’ book. He wanted to understand his
condition. So he wrote this book.
• An honest heart-breaking account of how generalized anxiety disorder affected Chris, his family and everyone around him, yet went undiagnosed.
‘Westoby’s memoir succeeds brilliantly. The reader comes away with a new and profound understanding of what mental illness feels like from within.’ Jonathan Taylor, Associate
Professor of Creative Writing, University of Leicester
‘This book offers young people an insight into the range of unique ways the world can be experienced and the chance to reflect on their own struggles and know they are not alone in
these. I have recommended this book to my academic colleagues, my students and my
children.’
Dr Judith Dyson, Reader Healthcare Research, Birmingham City University
‘Chris Westoby shows us what it is to make use of the resonant power of words to offer a
portal into what it is really like. A vital touchstone for public and health professionals alike,
to understand deeply, to see and to learn from first person experience.’
Kathleen T. Galvin, Professor of Nursing Practice, University of Brighton

Review

The book begins with Chris and his parents in Orlando looking at a space shuttle. It should have been exciting, and all that adrenaline should have been pumping and endorphins going round, but instead it is quite the opposite. Chris tells how he feels, this includes what he feels when anxious. It is graphic, real symptoms. I don’t mean anything gory or anything like that, I just mean, he tells it how it actually is for him and instead of enjoyment of life and this experience, it is more than a deep uncomfortableness. Anyone who experiences or has ever experienced anxiety will relate and it will also assist those who want to find out more what it can be like, which can be useful if you have a partner or friend etc who suffers from this or maybe in the future you might.

Chris then takes readers to his home in England and he meets a girl, Emma and attends college. The magnitude of anxiety and all that comes with it like self-doubt and talking yourself out of something really shows. The words etch into you, they become absorbing and immersive.

There are conversations in college around his learning, which is interesting, but so is the mindset of both tutors and Chris in many ways around this and the fact he needs to see a nurse and then a counsellor. It goes into detail of what actually goes through Chris’s mind when he needs to get this type of support and has an appointment.

The book progresses somewhat in that it shows more about the next stages and whether he stays at college or not and the decisions made, but all the while, showing his anxiety. The book shows the juxtopositions of Chris’s life of what he desires and wants to have the possibility to acheive and what his fear and anxiety is doing, that is curtailing this and ultimately gives a vision of what it is like to be okay until a certain age and later develop anxiety.

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#Bookreview by Lou of The Boy Between by Amanda Prowse and Josiah Hartley @mrsamandaprowse #JosiahHartley @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours #NonFiction #NonFictionNovember #MentalHealth #BlogTour

The Boy Between
By Amanda Prowse and Josiah Hartley
Rated: 5 stars ***** 

Today I have the priviledge of closing the blog tour for The Boy Between with a review
Tender, authentic, profound, honest and incredibly emotionally insightful – The Boy Between, you can tell, is written from the heart and covers so much ground in what became a family crisis, that I am sure will connect with so many people on some level or another and what makes it unique is, this crisis in mental health is told from a mother and son’s perspective. It makes it a rounded read and one I think will perhaps benefit so many people, whether you are the person directly suffering or someone more indirectly, caring or just perhaps know someone or want to find out more.

Thank you to Kelly at Love Books Tours for inviting me to review this book.
Find out about both authors below, then the blurb and review.

About the Authors

The Boy Between Josh ProwseJosiah (Josh) Hartley lives in an isolated farmhouse in the West Country, but close enough to Bristol to enjoy its music scene. He is an animal lover and servant to two French Bulldogs. Equally happy at a music festival or watching rugby with his mates, he likes the outdoor life and with Devon only a short drive away often heads to the sea to surf and sit on the beach watching the sun go down. After a stint at the University of Southampton and another at the University of Bristol and one unsuccessful suicide attempt, Josh decided to write about his descent into mental illness and the depression that has held him in its grip for the past few years. The Boy Between carries the overriding message that things can and often do get better. It’s a book of reflection, raw, honest and full of hope: the proof being that Josh is still here and now excited about what comes next. He is ready to catch any opportunities that life throws his way, quite a thing for someone who only three years ago was living in a world gone grey, ready to disappear from the face of the earth…

The Boy Between Amanda ProwseAmanda Prowse likens her own life story to those she writes about in her books. After self-publishing her debut novel, Poppy Day, in 2011, she has gone on to author twenty-five novels and six novellas. Her books have been translated into a dozen languages and she regularly tops bestseller charts all over the world. Remaining true to her ethos, Amanda writes stories of ordinary women and their families who find their strength, courage and love tested in ways they never imagined. The most prolific female contemporary fiction writer in the UK, with a legion of loyal readers, she goes from strength to strength. Being crowned ‘queen of domestic drama’ by the Daily Mail was one of her finest moments. Amanda is a regular contributor on TV and radio but her first love is, and will always be, writing. This is her first work of non-fiction.

You can find her online at www.amandaprowse.com, on Twitter or Instagram @MrsAmandaProwse, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/amandaprowsenogreaterlove.

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Blurb

Bestselling novelist Amanda Prowse knew how to resolve a fictional family crisis. But then her son came to her with a real one… 

Josiah was nineteen with the world at his feet when things changed. Without warning, the new university student’s mental health deteriorated to the point that he planned his own death. His mother, bestselling author Amanda Prowse, found herself grappling for ways to help him, with no clear sense of where that could be found. This is the book they wish had been there for them during those dark times.

Josiah’s situation is not unusual: the statistics on student mental health are terrifying. And he was not the only one suffering; his family was also hijacked by his illness, watching him struggle and fearing the day he might succeed in taking his life.

In this book, Josiah and Amanda hope to give a voice to those who suffer, and to show them that help can be found. It is Josiah’s raw, at times bleak, sometimes humorous, but always honest account of what it is like to live with depression. It is Amanda’s heart-rending account of her pain at watching him suffer, speaking from the heart about a mother’s love for her child.

For anyone with depression and anyone who loves someone with depression, Amanda and Josiah have a clear message—you are not alone, and there is hope.

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Review

No one wants to find themselves in a situation where their child becomes depressed or indeed has a mental health issue, but there is a heartfelt reminder at the start of the book that you are not alone. What Josiah and Amanda have done is bravely spoken out about how it is and how it came to be that a 19 year old boy became depressed. Hopefully one day it won’t be a brave thing to do, it just will float into natural conversation, but I use, that sometimes overrated word because mental health is still judged and still needs to be part of this type of conversation to get it even more into the public domain and in the hope that people will seek help.

It starts with a prologue as to the state in which Josh became so depressed he could have committed suicide, followed by an introduction by Amanda that shows what a hard predicament to find a household having to deal with and write it down. It’s such an honest account that they deserve kudos as they each write alternating chapters, so you as a reader can see 2 perspectives, one from Josiah who is deeply depressed and the other from Amanda who wants to save her son.
This book may resonate with some people, whether they are that person or caring for a person in similar circumstances and it also brings it more out into the public domain for a wider conversation, understanding and empathy.

The writing is absorbing because of the language that is used and you can almost feel what is being written. There is such honesty and a rawness that comes with that. It is incredibly moving and emotional and at the same time informative in a way and may well leave you just wanting to hug them.

There are some lovely tender moments when Amanda recollects when, Joshy, as she likes to call him, is very young and has the ambition of cutting grass and comes up with a rather emotionally intelligent answer as to why this and not something else. There is also, almost a bittersweetness to it. The importance of happiness also comes across.

The innermost thoughts are incredibly interesting from both Josiah and Amanda. What is fascinating and thought-provoking is some of the back-tracking Amanda does, from how her son was when he was very young to the present, in terms of his health and his personality traits and the correlations between how he was then and now, similarly as Josiah talks about his own life from the past and present. There are some uplifiting moments that just capture a different, more positive, lighter side of life that spike through times when life was quite the opposite.

It is highly responsible too that they have highlighted high profile mental health campaigns such as ‘Campaign Against Living Miserably’ and ‘Britain Get Talking’ amongst others, including Mental Health Month and then there is also MIND and The Samaritans. At the bottom of my review, I will add some contact links to people who can assist. Never find yourself alone. Within the book there is also a list of symptoms to depression. It’s all incredibly well thought out, it is about the authors lives, which I’m certain many readers will be able to relate to and also has helpful information throughout it as well, that builds for a greater understanding. It is more than lists, it is from the point of view of how it actually feels for Josiah as well. There are the challenges of school, homelife and university life. There is the mother trying to do the best she can for her son and wishing for a better outcome and then there is the offspring, going through depression and in reality they are both, in different ways, having to deal with it and live with it. It really shows how mental health issues can affect the whole family, just in different ways.

The book takes a very interesting look into universities, it could actually provide some use for people within them, for students, but a greater insight for those who are staffing them. It also shows up what is lacking within society that needs fixing, whether that was intentional or not, I do not know, but it’s certainly there, which could be very thought-provoking as a society as a whole, in how behaviours affect others. It is startling how much pressure is there, when it is actually all written down, from work/study/life balance to barely being seen as a whole human-being in places like universities and more and how it all made, in this instance, Josh feel and the impact it had.

The book also goes into an interesting look into anti-depressants, Josh’s take on them and also some of the effects he had and being in the psychiatrist’s office and also the lack of understanding from friends. This really is such an honest look into his life.

It concludes with very helpful advice for those who have depression and those who are carers/guardians/friends of those with depression that could really benefit someone in someway and are really easy to do. There is also a list of people, really famous people, who readers perhaps wouldn’t have thought, could possibly have depression because of being in the spotlight so much for their achievements. It also shows some hope and positivity for the authors futures.

Useful Links – You Are Not Alone.
The links below are of places you can go confidentiality to seek any confidential assistance you may need. I’ve added them here but please know, I would not know if you have clicked on them or not.

Mind               Samaritans

#Bookreview by Lou of To Be A Gay Man By Will Young @willyoung @penguinrandom @EburyPublishing

To Be A Gay Man
By Will Young
Rated: 5 stars *****

Authentic, Brave, Emotional, Honest, Essential Reading.

Will Young broke into mass public consiousness on Pop Idol. Since then I have seen his blossoming career in, not just pop music, but on stage in many shows like Cabaret, Strictly Ballroom and more and in films like Mrs Henderson Presents. where he also shines and in some pretty brave and frank interviews. He’s taken this braveness to a whole new level and gone much further and delved much more into the his inner feelings on life. Whether you are within the LGBTQ community, which is of course the primary reach of this book to raise awareness of mental health, or not, this is inspiring, informative and there is something that anyone can grasp onto and take away with them.
He also has a new album out called – Lexicon.

Thank you to Penguin Random House and E-bury Publishing publicists for accepting my request to review.
Follow down for the synopsis, review and essential links to mental health charities, as noted within this book.

Synopsis

In To Be a Gay Man, Will Young speaks out about gay shame, revealing the impact it had on his own life, how he learned to deal with it, and how he can now truthfully say he is gay and happy.

We know Will as a multi-platinum recording artist, Olivier-nominee, and the first winner of the Idol franchise. But his story began long before his first audition. Looking back on a world where growing up being called gay was the ultimate insult and coming out after a lifetime of hiding his sexuality, Will explores the long-lasting impact repressing his true self has had.

As Will’s own story demonstrates, internalised shame in childhood increases the risk of developing low self-worth, and even self-disgust, leading to destructive behaviours in adult life.

Will revisits the darkest extremes he has been to, sharing his vulnerabilities, his regrets, tracing his own navigation through it all and showing the way for others who might have felt alone in the same experience.

Here you will find a friend, champion and mentor, breaking taboos with frank honesty, and offering invaluable practical advice on overcoming the difficult issues too often faced within the LGBTQ+ community.

How To Be A Gay Man

Review

The book opens, practically with a smile. Who can resist reading about a crisp autumnal morning, even if there is a rude awakening by Nellie, Will Young’s daschund who wakes him up and goes on to the podcast he and Chris Sweeney have founded, called the Homo-Sapien’s Podcast.

Will Young talks candidly about the online communities that go about Gay-Shaming. I’m heterosexual myself, but accept everyone and it’s absolutely emotional and shocking to the core. I am impressed that Will Young has got the courage to tell the world about what he found. In this book there’s definitely a certain amount of strength of character.

He then goes onto talk very personally about his family and relationship with his dad and the bullying within the education system and how he reckons LGBTQ is still not addressed properly. What is good, is he backs it up with facts, using The Trevor Project in the USA and Stonewall in the UK for examples and for research into his basis. It makes this a stronger book for it. It’s a real mix of facts, figures, his personal experiences and opinions.

He also addresses the layers of being gay, which may be evident if you have a friend who is in the LGBTQ community or are within it yourself. He also backtracks in time and talks about what it was like in the 1980’s, drawing upon Freddie Mercury and also the detrimental effect parts of religion has had. He also talks of the effects of AIDS in-relation to some of the “public notices” put out and the effects and then even further in time on the government’s “Section 28”, which is more in the present times.
He does touch on theatre and film, but more in-terms of role models, or rather lack of role models who are gay and what that would mean to him and also how the stereotyping when writing a role for a gay character and talks of some actors at a particular time.

You can practically feel the pain leaping off the page as he talks about his prep-school years. He’s also honest about the growing-up and the sexuality side of that time of life and the opening up to a friend.
There are also moments I’m pretty sure some people would bury, never to be repeated again, but this is enlightening and courageous as he talks about regrets and also the shame he has felt and what he has had to deal with.

He touches on Pop Idol and gaining confidence and although he talks a bit about sex, it isn’t in any crude way at all and has a point, but then do does absolutely everything that is written. Everyone can take something away from this book, learn something new or have something clarified or relate to it on all sorts of levels.

He also touches upon the sense of community he does feel and also a bit about volunteer charitable works he is involved in, which, again shows another slice of his life.

Don’t get this wrong. This isn’t a “poor me” type of book. I’ve seen those and this definitely is not one of them. This is very different to those. It’s inspiring and raising awareness and is thought-provoking in a non-pretentious way, which is impressive. He also doesn’t appear to shy away from anything, but tells it how it is for him and it feels honest.

Later, the book moves into his mental health and having a breakdown and PTSD and how it came about and how he seeked help and how he felt. It goes further than that and on closer inspection, there are more parts that are thought-provoking and perhaps some people will also be able to gain, not just knowledge about Will Young, but also certain things that could apply to their lives and that could just assist someone that little bit, but it isn’t a self-help book as such though. He delves into the conditions of drealisation and depersonalisation that he has and going into therapy.

He details what he found in another book, other elements that, it doesn’t matter who you are, what you do, your sexual orientation, that could be beneficial to people as he describes Perfectionism etc and how that is for him, but really you can transplant your own life, if you are a perfectionist etc. At the end, head to the Appendix. It is very responsibly and thoughtfully got CBT Techniques  and then in the second Appendix there is Help and Support contacts.

Will Young writes about how he wanted to connect with himself. The book, I think has enough within it that there will be people who could potentially find it so helpful not to feel alone. The fact that is an extensive list of charities too that specialise in LGBTQ is fabulous. No one should be alone and please, if you are having any issues with mental health or anything, please know that there is support out there. I have listed just a couple from the list Will Young has in his book. They are there for the LGBTQ community and this includes families too.

Links to Support and Mental Health Teams

LGBTQ Foundation
Provides as wide range of services to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-people.
https://lgbt.foundation/          Tel: 03453 303030

Mermaids
Charity Supporting young trans people as well as their families.
https://www.mermaidsuk.org.uk    Tel: 0808 801 0400

Mind Out
LGBTQ+ mental health service
https://www.mindout.org.uk    Tel: 01273 234839