#BookReview By Lou of The Genesis Inquiry By Olly Jarvis @OllyJarviso @HobeckBooks #Thriller #genesis #legalthriller #BlogTour #TeamHobeck

The Genesis Inquiry
By Olly Jarvis
Rated 5 stars *****

I am delighted to be on the blog tour for The Genesis Inquiry by Olly Jarvis. It is a compelling and intricately plotted legal thriller that it has that grip factor right to the end. No wonder even Stephen Fry totally rates this Ella Blake Thriller too. He’s not wrong! Find out more in the blurb and my review for the rest of my thoughts below…
Find out other praise for previous books below too.
First I thank Hobeck Books for gifting me a copy of the book and inviting me onto their blog tour.

TGI Cover

Blurb

‘What a treat it is to read Olly Jarvis’s THE GENESIS INQUIRY: a compulsively readable crime and legal thriller that pulls off the trick of being both satisfyingly traditional and supremely up to the minute. In the attractive, cussed and charismatic person of lawyer Ella Blake, Jarvis has created a hero that we can hope to see again. A real winner.’
STEPHEN FRY

Is there one last undiscovered, great truth?

A moment zero, a place in time that links all cultures and creeds?

A revelation that will unite us all and change the way we see history forever?

Brilliant but burnt-out barrister Ella Blake accepts an apparently simple brief: investigate the mysterious disappearance of an African American polymath from his rooms at Cambridge University. The Inquiry quickly becomes the greatest challenge of her life – solving the mystery of Genesis.

Facing danger at every turn, can Ella find the answers to the riddles and clues left by the missing genius?

Reunited with her estranged daughter, the Inquiry sends them on a quest across the world and through ancient texts.

What is the secret that binds us all?

Who is behind the dark forces that will stop at nothing to prevent the world from knowing the truth?

The Genesis Inquiry is an epic and gripping thriller by the brilliant Olly Jarvis which asks a key question – what can our shared past tell us about humanity’s future?

Review

TGI CoverThe book starts with a thought provoking quote before getting into the story itself, which begins in Northumberland, northeast coast of England, where Ella Blake is a lawyer and her clerk is Jim Hodges.

From the start, the quality of writing is most excellent and makes you want to read more, especially when Ella, a great Silk is losing some of her mo-jo and not entirely sure she wants to continue or not. Her clerk thinks she shouldn’t disappear from the profession just yet and gets her involved in another case at a university. Ella is a hard one to get to change her mind though and is pretty down on herself; this aspect and her practically single-mindedness is something that Jarvis gets down so perfectly believable. It allows readers to get inside her mindset a bit.

There is also Lizzie Blake, studying at Cambridge, with no love life to speak of, but there is a chance encounter with a guy, in not the usual manner of meeting someone.
It’s also interesting to see the relationship between Ellie and her daughter unfold.

When at the De Jure college, the professor has certainly done his homework on Ella and knows almost a creepy amount about her, but shrugs that aside. The case in hand is what happened to Matthew Shepherd, who has mysteriously disappeared, but there is also the question of whether an inquiry that may raise attention, is really the course of action that needs to now be taken. Even with this thought, she still does some investigating. This becomes so intriguing and is a book that you can easily lose some hours with reading. There are messages to decode and puzzling riddles and murders to solve. The Genesis Inquiry soon turns into a page-turner of a twisty thriller. It grabs from the beginning and then as it goes on, its grip increases. This is compulsive, addictive reading at its best! There is much for the reader to focus on and to see how it all ends as it takes readers (and the characters) in many directions. The crime is intricately planned, involving comets and more…
The case delves into both ancient history and modern times through technologies and texts that sends them to not just places in the UK, but also so many other countries in the world. Weaving through this are some modern day issues.
This is far, far from an average case to solve!

PRAISE FOR OLLY JARVIS’S EARLIER NOVELS
‘A legal thriller in the great Grisham tradition – genius author!’
Gyles Brandreth

‘The violence in the criminal underworld of Manchester is presented in scenes which are short
and shocking. Cut-Throat Defence is an excellent read.’
Simon Brett

‘The tautly-written, tense thriller weaves together the fates of crime victims, gangsters, cops and
lawyers – often culminating in realistic courtroom drama.’
Manchester Evening News

TGI Blog Tour Poster

#BookReview by Lou – The New Home By Chris Merritt @DrCJMerritt @bookouture #PsychologicalThriller #Thriller

The New Home
By Chris Merritt

Rating: 5 out of 5.

The New Home is a stand-alone psychological thriller that has a quiet intensity propelling the pages to turn and will keep you guessing. FInd out more in the blurb and then my full review,
First, thanks to Bookouture and Chris Merritt for the book and allowing me to review.

The New Home

Blurb

The New HomeFreya loves her new home on a quiet suburban street. And her beautiful neighbour Emily is everything she’s ever wanted in a best friend. Finally, she has somebody to share her secrets with over a glass of wine. But as Freya watches her new friend setting the table for dinner one evening, she sees something shocking that makes her think that Emily’s life might not be as perfect as it seems. Days later, Emily and her daughter vanish…

When you meet Emily’s husband, you will think you know what he’s hiding.

You will ask yourself whether Emily and Freya really did meet by chance.

You will think you know what happened to Emily and her little girl the night they went missing.

But when you discover the truth, it will shake you to your core and you will lie awake at night wondering if you can ever really trust the people in the house next door…

Review

Jack and his fiancee, Freya have moved to Sunningdale Road to Weybridge, a London suburb. They move to a house, which should have been wonderful. A new home also brings new neighbours to get to know. These are Emily and Michael and their daughter Thea. There is also Cathy to meet, along the way. Things seem like they could be okay, even though Emily and Michael’s relationship have strains within it due to bereavement of a miscarriage, which Emily are trying to talk through with therapist, Laurence.
There is also control within relationships and delusion that are some of the other meaty themes dealt with in the threads of the book.

 Emily and Thea go missing and the search, reported on the news, is on. As time goes on, the mystery to the disappearance of them deepens, and also feels more sinister and at times, spine-tinglingly so. The quiet intensity also builds, that wraps around this psychological thriller that keeps you guessing to the end and leave you thinking about it for a while after, since what seems like a nice neighbourhood has darkness within it.

On another note, this book may be also good for book clubs as it holds plenty to discuss within the themes raised and character behaviours.

Read to the very end and find an author’s note about the themes dealt with in this book and holds an important message for readers.

This is the author’s first standalone novel. He is known more for writing series and it absolutely does not disappoint!

 

#BookReview by Lou of False Truth – A Joe Wilde Investigation by C.D. Steele #CDSteele @BookGuild #CrimeFiction #PrivateInvestigatorFiction

False Truth
By C.D. Steele

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

False Truth is a book full of mystery and just when you suspect what happened, something else does, creating the most unexpected twists that grip in a sensational story.

Thanks to C.D. Steele for contacting me to review and gifting me his book – False Truth.

False Truth

Blurb

Private Investigator and former MI6 agent Joe Wilde is hired by Sally Devlin to investigate her son’s disappearance. Liam Devlin was a rising football star. His car was found abandoned at Lea Bridge in Hackney, a known suicide spot, six weeks prior. With help from friend and retired MI6 Data Technician Mark Thompson, Joe uncovers a huge secret in Liam’s life. Putting the pieces together, he starts to suspect that this case is far more complex than he originally envisioned. Falling ever deeper into his own investigations, Joe meets with the detective in charge of the case, D. I. Carl Whatmore, who does not take kindly to Joe getting involved. As Joe and D. I. Whatmore go head-to-head in their own investigations, more lives are put in danger. But who will crack the case? Only time will tell…

Review

Joe Wilde is a Private Investigator who is a former MI6 agent, which makes him intriguing from the outset. He has other friends from MI6 who help him in cases. This time, a meaty case turns up, one that isn’t trying to find out whether a lover is cheating on their partner or not. Sally Devlin hires him because her son, Liam, considered a rising star in football has disappeared, all they’ve got is his car that turns up at Lea Bridge.

There’s also a political element to the book as Joe’s friend Phil Harkes works for MI5 in counter-terrorism, after much time in MI6 and had been working on a case where an MP was murdered.

Working relationships are often interesting to read about and there are certainly differences between Joe Wilde and Detective Inspector Carl Whatmore, who’s path he has to cross as he wonders what he wants with the Liam case.

Readers really get a sense of walking in the shoes of a P.I. as he knocks door to door (readers certainly won’t forget Joe Wilde’s name with the number of times he has to introduce himself. At first I thought this was exessive, until I thought about it and it actually gives a real sense of realism), to try and find people who knew something and to piece bits of info together. It’s worth staying with…

The case gets more intriguing the more the leads build and even takes Joe to Paraguay, where the mystery to his disappearance continues and the intrigue notches up as there appears there may be more than meets the eye. Then the mystery racks a further notch and the twists and turns that come, become tight and the pace quickens.

#BookReview of amazing 5 star book – The Things I Want To Say But Can’t By Carla Christian @Carla_C_Author @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours

The Things I Want To Say But Can’t
By Carla Christian
Rated: 5 Stars *****

Not so long ago I revealed the cover for The Things I Want To Say But Can’t. Now I have the priviledge of sharing my review of its contents. Readers are in for a treat! This is a debut novel, but it feels like this author has been writing for years. This book seriously reads like there have been many books under her belt, even though there is not. It’s seriously impressive and hard to put down.

One emotional journey of life! That’s what this story is. It’ll grab you and hold you so you can’t let it go and will stay with you for a bit longer as you come to terms with what just happened. I don’t think readers will be disappointed. I certainly was not.
In the acknowledgements, Carla Christian credits being inspired by One Day by David Nicholls. It’s certainly almost as good as that, but with a bigger intensity. Both One Day and The Things I Want To Say But Can’t, hook you into characters lives, but different genres. Then there is “You” in the story…
I thank Love Books Tours for inviting me on the blogtour to review. I thank Carla Christian for signing the book and for Lets Get Booked for sending it. Please note this has no bearing on what I have rated or written in the review. I have based it on its own merits. 

Find out more below in the blurb and my review.

About The Author

CopenhaganMe (1) (2)Carla Christian lives in the Lake District in the North of England. A busy working mum of two teenagers, she has a passion for writing, art and travel, and these interests have been a part of her for as long as she can remember. 

Constantly inspired by both the good and the bad in the world around her, she spends much of her time creating in one way or another; be it painting canvases for the blank walls of her new home, sketching pictures to capture memories of the many travel adventures she’s been lucky enough to go on, baking fantastical cakes with her daughter, or writing endless beginnings to a million unfinished stories.

The Things I Want To Say But Can’t is her first novel.

Blurb

‘A lifetime of endings, a million goodbyes. None of them right. It’s funny what you remember when you’ve got nothing else to think about. All those things you should’ve said while you had the chance. You never learned, did you? You never, ever learned.’

Belle has a habit of losing things. Her friends. Her lovers. Her mind.

Everything ends eventually, or at least that’s what life has taught her. But what if everything she lost came back again? What if she got a chance to finally have her say? To face her past. To put things right.

Second chances aren’t easy when memories are all you have. So, when Belle invites the nightmares of her past back in, is she willing to deal with the consequences? Because maybe, just maybe, this time she’s getting what she deserves.

What I Want to Say Cover

Review

Sharp, cutting and moving from the start, this tells the story of Isobel’s life. It’s definitely one powerful story that Carla Christian has written. The pain is striking! The sense of real emotion is written with a light touch and yet so excellently observed. It starts at a funeral to a new love and beyond. The pain is physical, psychological, emotional. It’s uncanny how recognisable it is, right to every nuance. I, who rarely cries, wants to, but doesn’t, and instead, I carry on in amazement at the writing, wanting to know more as it’s off-set with some joyous moments before turning a deep, dark corner. It’s quite extraordinary and incredibly enthralling and good!

There’s a new potential lover who comes onto the scene in a bar. She can’t take her eyes off this person. I can’t take my eyes off the words leaping off the page as the intensity increases. This is clever. The writing remains taught, even when Isobel is recalling compliments. Everything becomes heightened. What if her lover – referred to as You, discovers too much about her?

Butterflies do come into it when Isobel comes across Amy. She has a jar full of caterpillars because she wants to see them turn into butterflies. It’s sweet and innocent, mostly. Do take note of the dates as there are some that go back to the time of childhood. It works incredibly well in telling a bit of back story, which eases off the tension a little, before ramping it up again in Isobel’s adult life, especially with “You”.

The contrast between the beauty and vividness of butterflies and the darker edges of human life is stark and paints a picture itself. One that twists to some dark places of human behaviour and the cruelty that can occur in life that can creep up and subtly build and build, before you know what’s going on. It makes for a fascinating read of cause and effect and how the past is often still there and how it can mould, shape and transform life.

Interestingly, readers can, in part 2 of the book, see what happened before “You”, when there was the relationship with Matthew, which is when life begins to slide. Then there is the third and part of what happens after “You” and things change again, with so much to face and overcome. The fourth part is The End that is shocking! Brilliantly written, but shocking, not for art’s sake of creating a crescendo, but because it is fitting with the story.

Those caterpillars, earlier, in the jar, waiting to be beautiful, elegant butterflies becomes more and more nuanced in adult life. What seemed innocent in childhood, becomes less so later on, I realise as my mind casts back and then to the current pages, as it becomes more apparent that there’s a lot more than the lust of earlier, it turns into something ugly and would make anyone wonder if she’s always going to be trapped like those caterpillars or if there will she be able to fly away, like the butterflies?
Read this amazing book to find out if she, like the caterpillar, can transform?

Buy Link  Amazon

The Necklace by Matt Witten @MattZWitten @oceanviewpub #Thriller #CrimeFiction #TheNecklace

The Necklace
By Matt Witten

The Necklace is a fast-paced, tense page-turner thriller that is optioned for a film by none other than Leonardo Dicaprio, written by Matt Witten, who has also written for huge and incredibly popular tv series, as you’ll find out below.
Discover more about the author, the blurb, rest of my review and links below.

Firstly, thank you to Matt Witten for being in touch via the Contact Me part of my blog to request a review of his book and for gifting me the book.

About the Author

Matt Witten wrote mystery novels set in upstate New York that were published by Signet. Then moved to LA and began writing for TV: Law & Order, House, Pretty Little Liars, CSI: Miami, Medium, and other shows. The Necklace is his first novel since he began writing for TV. It’s gotten blurbs/reviews/quotes from Lee Child, Meg Gardiner, and Lisa Gardner, and it’s been optioned for film by Leonardo DiCaprio.

The Necklace

Blurb

The clock ticks down in a heart-pounding crusade for justice

Susan Lentigo’s daughter was murdered twenty years ago–and now, at long last, this small-town waitress sets out on a road trip all the way from Upstate New York to North Dakota to witness the killer’s execution.

On her journey she discovers shocking new evidence that leads her to suspect the condemned man is innocent–and the real killer is still free. Even worse, her prime suspect has a young daughter who’s at terrible risk. With no money and no time to spare, Susan sets out to uncover the truth before an innocent man gets executed and another little girl is killed.

But the FBI refuses to reopen the case. They–and Susan’s own mother–believe she’s just having an emotional breakdown. Reaching deep, Susan finds an inner strength she never knew she had. With the help of two unlikely allies–a cynical, defiant teenage girl and the retired cop who made the original arrest–Susan battles the FBI to put the real killer behind bars. Will she win justice for the condemned man–and her daughter–at last?
Optioned for film–with Leonardo DiCaprio attached as producer

Review

The Necklace

The protagonist is a middle-aged woman – Susan Lentigo. Life is tough as she is only just squeezing out a living for herself as a waitress. There, Amy, who is pretty world wise at such a young age about money as she worries about things like a necklace, being too expensive for her mum to buy. The book is astutely observant in its narration and conversations for all the characters. In the beginning the atmosphere is warm and fuzzy. The necklace itself is cute and lovely, but this quickly turns as the story unfolds and becomes a thriller about what happened to Amy.

The atmosphere becomes chilling and what seems at first a slow-burn, becomes a very fast-paced thriller that does not miss a beat. Every word is crucial as is every nuance as tension increasingly builds.

The Necklace, succinctly and expertly shows both the present times and Amy’s backstory, both which evokes many emotions of sadness and anger from the people within it. Weaving through Amy’s story is also about the relationship between Susan and her mother as they try to live in the same home together, which is also interesting.

Susan’s worst nightmare happened 20 years ago and the aftermath of the spiraling of her mental health and also a recovery of sorts, with the appropriate help is portrayed well.  There is also the search and hope that the necklace will be found and the trial. The case throws up many questions, which adds another layer, including showing how far forensics has come over the past couple of decades. All isn’t as clear cut as it seems and a race against time ensues to find out the truth. Each stage of the book is gripping in many ways. The experience Matt Witten has in tv translates very well into writing books.

As The Necklace plays out, it is easy to see why it is optioned for a film and would, if translated well onto the screen, will be as enthralling as the book. It is definitely worth reading the book first as it is such a page-turner and readers will get to know the woman who may not have much, but has a bundle of strength to get to the truth of who’s innocent, who’s guilty.

Advance Praise

“[The Necklace] is as fast and tense as a great thriller should be, but it’s full of warmth and humanity too–one small-town woman’s quest for the most poignant kind of justice you could imagine. Buy it today and read it tonight!” –Lee Child, New York Times best-selling author

Thelma and Louise meets The Green Mile in this unique and powerful thriller following one mother’s cross-country journey to find the truth.” –Lisa Gardner, New York Times best-selling author

The Necklace is an addictively readable story of a mother’s quest for justice. Surprising, propulsive, and poignant. I inhaled this novel.” –Meg Gardiner, Edgar Award-winning autor

Website and Buy Links:

Website: Matt Witten 

Amazon UK          Amazon US        Barnes and Noble       Apple         BooksaMillion           

Kobo               Indiebound

No Honour by Awais Khan @AwaisKhan @OrendaBooks #NoHonour #Abida

No Honour
By Awais Khan

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

No Honour is intensely powerful, gritty and brave. Find out more in the blurb and the rest of my review and then discover more about the author.
Firstly, thanks to Random Things Tours for inviting me to the blog tour and thanks to Orenda Books for gifting me the book. Follow through to find out more 

No Honour Graphic 2 (1)

Blurb

No Honour Vis 2In sixteen-year-old Abida’s small Pakistani village, there are age-old rules to live by, and her family’s honour to protect. And, yet, her spirit is defiant and she yearns to make a home with the man she loves.
When the unthinkable happens, Abida faces the same fate as other young girls who have chosen unacceptable alliances – certain, public death. Fired by a fierce determination to resist everything she knows to be wrong about the society into which she was born, and aided by her devoted father, Jamil, who puts
his own life on the line to help her, she escapes to Lahore – only to disappear.
Jamil goes to Lahore in search of Abida – a city where the prejudices that dominate their village take on a new and horrifying form – and father and daughter are caught in a world from which they may never escape.

In sixteen-year-old Abida’s small Pakistani village, there are age-old rules to live by, and her family’s honour to protect. And, yet, her spirit is defiant and she yearns to make a home with the man she loves.
When the unthinkable happens, Abida faces the same fate as other young girls who have chosen unacceptable alliances – certain, public death. Fired by a fierce determination to resist everything she knows to be wrong about the society into which she was born, and aided by her devoted father, Jamil, who puts
his own life on the line to help her, she escapes to Lahore – only to disappear.
Jamil goes to Lahore in search of Abida – a city where the prejudices that dominate their village take on a new and horrifying form – and father and daughter are caught in a world from which they may never escape.

No Honour Graphic 3

Review

No Honour is set in Lahore, Pakistan. It tells a very brave and moving story of Jamil and Abida. It doesn’t hide away from anything, including the notion of honour killings and drug and alcohol abuse. Awais Khan, it feels, tells so much about the culture and attitudes in Pakistan. It’s a tense, but fascinating read. The writing is with strong intent to tell the story of what, perhaps many women experience. It, although a work of fiction, also shines a light on inside Pakistan and at least pockets of its population.

Abida has a fiesty temperament about her when it comes to her baby and Kalim, the man she loves, but sometimes in the background and other times in the foreground are age old traditions and age old attitudes like being pregnant out of wedlock that make it all not as plain-sailing as the western world would perhaps experience.  She is a woman who knows what she wants and who she wants to be with though and as you read, you hope that she does manage to get this in the end, but there are many challenges, including the increasingly erratic behaviours of Kalim.
The book is gritty and don’t expect an easy read, but instead, one of important social and family issues, including that of bringing shame on the family as Abida has, in accordance to the rules. It is a striking, brutal book in many ways and one where fear grips people. It’s hardhitting on a number of pages, but even then, it is one of those books that is irresistable and the end has to be reached. This is a book that may well have readers not wanting to take life and allies for granted ever again.

No Honour Graphic

No Honour BT Poster