#Theatre #Review By Lou of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel By #DeborahMoggach #HaleyMills #RulaLenska #AndyDeLaTour #ShilaIbqual #NishadMore #PaulNicholas #TheBestExoticMarigoldHotel #TheatreRoyalGlasgow #UKTour #2022Tour #2023Tour

Review of The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
By Deborah Moggach. 

Based on the film, my heart soared with joy from start to finish when watching the stage version at the Theatre Royal in Glasgow, Scotland. It is still touring and will into 2023. Find out more about the cast and my review below.

 

Review

Based on the film, The Best Exotic Marigold is stunning on stage. I saw it at the Theatre Royal In Glasgow. It is touring into next year. The cast is amazing. There is isn’t a single one who isn’t a strong member. I admit, I hesitated when I saw this was being made into a theatre play because I loved the films so much, but when the cast list appeared, I knew I had to give it a go and I also knew I may never see Haley Mills and Rula Lenska on stage again in this play, in Scotland. It is exciting that this is doing a tour before it even reaches London’s West End. That is so wonderful because it gives so many places a chance of seeing it now, instead of waiting. I love the Westend I hasten to add, but I often find this a genius way of doing theatre.
But, was the play good and my attraction to the storyline still there in my heart and soul?

The play was everything I had hoped for an more. Rula Lenska brought wit and glamour, Haley Mills brought charm, Shila Iqbal and Nishad More and Andy De La Tour played their parts with aplomb too and RekhaThe rest of the cast were also just as fabulous.

By and large it followed the film well and cleverly added updated references to means of communication, such as mentioning Zoom and in someways the highlighting to how the UK treat their elderly and comparing it to India was even more striking and also updated to reflect a bit of the political sphere.

There was humour, warmth and charm and everything the film has in droves and in some ways , certain points made and certain bits of humour was sharper, quicker. All eyes were on this fabulous cast. It was a cast of sheer skill as the cast made the audience feel involved, don’t mistaken this as an audience participation thing, it isn’t that, it was a hand gesture, a look, a sentence. I was captivated from start to finish.

The set was creative and awe inspiring for the hotel and it was ingenious to then become the call centre at various points.

This is a play I recommend you book if you can. It’s amazing and will remain in my heart and soul for a very long time.

The play is on a 2022/2023 tour in the UK.

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#Review By Lou of Seeds of Memories – BlackHoundProductions @bphoundp – Reflective, Poignant, Hopeful #SeedsOfMemories #Theatre #Drama #EdFringe #EdFringe2022

Seeds of Memories
By Patrick Withey

Rating: 5 out of 5.

A warm thanks to Cordelia for the invitation to review the poignant, hopeful, reflective play Seeds of Memories at The Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Find out more in the pics and my review below…



Ethereal Poignant

Sad Joyful

Exuberant. Peaceful

Creative Imaginative


The music, just before the cast were on stage had an air of sadness with something hopeful and positive reaching through, which captured the play very well.
Seeds of Memories is about grief, but not how you my suppose it would be. This is far from depressing. The story is told through the actors and puppets. Grandad and blackbirds in the garden are represented by puppets, which adds to the creativity and poignancy.

Grandad had a passion for his garden and he would tell his son, stories and poems; a recurring one throughout is one about seeing magpies – “One For Sorrow, Two For Joy”.

The seamless flashbacks, taken by grandad’s son – A, played by Ollie J. Edwards are exuberant and full of childlike joy and energy, each time he is there, in the garden with him. Then, in the present, he conveys, further, his love of his grandad, through peaceful reflections. A takes the audience through grandad’s life, of what he knew and through his own life, growing up. He gives his grandad life again and real imagery, yes, aided by the puppet, but also enough for the imagination to takeover. Grandad is given real personality and life experiences, that most people will relate to. Ollie, playing A had great comic timing. He could make you almost feel your eyes watery and then, suddenly, he will have you smiling or laughing as he demonstrates that grief isn’t always sad 24/7. All the way through, holding the audience and making his character be empathised and sympathised with.

Another dimension is given to aid this telling of this family’s story along. If ivy-clad walls could talk…. Well, this one could. Lisha Allen put in an ethereal performance, owning the stage as she moved around, everywhere on the stage, speaking with an almost haunting voice, as she looked unflinchingly and almost directly into your soul, as she ensured the audience, observing, were captured in the garden. The character was clever, just as nature has wisdom within it, so does the character of Nature, on stage, as more thought provoking points and reflection was created.

Mum/Nan, played by Lesley Hayes brought humour and matter of factness and got it spot on.

The play is written very well by Patrick Withey, and thoughtfully. In some parts, although, very contemporary, it has an almost Shakespearean feel and it also feels timeless and authentic.

The play, perhaps, surprisingly, has a had many bursts of positivity and shown how, even in the darkest of times, life can still be lived. If you’ve experienced grief or want to know an angle of what it may be like to, then if you ever get to see this play, which I reckon should be funded to tour, it is that good, then I highly recommend it. It might even have you thinking of your grandad and about how he sown seeds of memories within you to spread and tell, to keep an essence of him alive and how we, who are alive are expanding our seeds of memories by those passed onto us and as we create new ones, that we share.

#Review By Lou at Edinburgh Fringe Festival of – Once Sinha Lifetime ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️@paulsinha @edfringe @Edfringe2022 @ARedinburgh #OnceSinhaLifetime #Comedy

Review of In Conversation With
Paul Sinha and Once Sinha Lifetime

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I went to see Paul Sinha’s show – Once Sinha Lifetime in the Assembly Rooms on George Street at The Edinburgh Fringe. It’s a candid, yet very entertaining with its well thought out flow in its construction. It’s definitely one to go and see, with one of the catchiest titles I’ve seen.
Paul Sinha is known for The Chase. The chaser who is a doctor and cracks some jokes. This is because he is also a comedian and comedy took over from being a GP. I saw 2 shows – In Conversation With…. and Once Sinha Lifetime, do I’ll write about both here. I highly recommend seeing his skilled comedy that whisks you into fascinating insights and a really good late afternoon out.

Below, you’ll find a link to book for Once Sinha Lifetime.

Before I continue, thanks to Paul Sinha for the photo.
I first saw the show… In Conversation With Paul Sinha. It made me want to see Once Sinha Lifetime. The In conversation was informative and very interesting as he took an enthralled audience through his younger years, his relationship with his parents and how they really wanted him to study science to be a GP. He also talked about how he had to make a decision between being a comedian or a GP once his agent started to get him more gigs and he couldn’t always make them due to clinic work etc. Turned out he made the right decision.   He talked candidly about how his diagnosis of Parkinson’s came about. What struck me is that he seems quite positive and upbeat, which in turn was heartening, but perhaps I found it so because my mum has MS and also has a positive attitude. He also talked candidly about The Chase and quizzing.

The ‘In Conversation’ show neatly fit together with his comedy show – Once Sinha Lifetime (and yet also good as a stand alone as the In Conversation was 1 night only, whereas the comedy show is on for longer). It has to be said, without a doubt that it is one of the most memorable titles at the festival.

There is much humour within his comedic retelling of lifetime moments, which created a different sort of atmosphere, a bit lighter with shades of darkness you might say, but still with a candid nature as he covered the topics mentioned previously.

It is all very well constructed as he expertly weaves jokes, politics,  life story telling and more, in and out of bursts of song and keyboard playing as he tells his audience what he wants them to know.

He also treated the audience to an insight of the first show he performed, it gave an insight into how far he has come and his beginnings of how he got started.
The audience weren’t merely observers to this fabulous show as he also had time to put in another thing he does best – quizzing, as he put out to the audience as a whole, a few questions from time to time to time that fit perfectly into this show.

There weren’t any props as such, except a table and keyboard, but nonetheless effective. Sometimes less really is more. I was curious about the book on the table and its significance.
For the readers out there, go and see his show to find out why there is an autobiography on the table that is not his own. I won’t say anything much more as there is a point to it and it would be a spoiler, but it is perhaps one of the most unexpected reasons that has much humour attached to it.

For both shows, it was clear that Paul Sinha cared how he was delivering to the audience and he talked about what he wanted to divulge. He also talked about considering writing an autobiography. As I said to him at the time, I absolutely think this should happen. There’s plenty of life experiences and enough that would interest audiences. He packs a lot in his hour long shows and I’m sure there’s even more to put into a book. I’d also be happy to see him again doing comedy. I’d be happy to read and review what he had to write about, based on what I’ve seen in these shows if a book ever does come into fruition.

The link to book your tickets, which I highly recommend you do – Once Sinha Lifetime

@edfringe #Review By Lou of Les Dawson Flying High performed by Jon Culshaw ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ @jonculshaw @edfringe @ARedinburgh #EdinburghFestivalFringe #EdFringe2022

Today I have a review from the Edinburgh Fringe Festival of an incredibly talented and humorous performance – Les Dawson Flying High performed by Jon Culshaw at the Assembly George Square – Gordon Aikman Theatre – I have put a couple of links to book below,  first, onto the set picture and my review.

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Les Dawson was one of those comedians that has longevity and comedians and audiences had admired for decades and even as the world changes and he is unfortunately long since passed away (1993), audiences watching tv, still have a right good laugh at his jokes and admire the construct of them and his piano playing skills, as do many modern day comedians.

Jon Culshaw, an impressionist who has great enduring success himself on tv and radio and is perhaps most famous for Dead Ringers and Horrible Histories as well as dramas such as Missing and so much more and has, according to IMDB, got a part in a Doctor Who story in 2023.

For now though, Jon Culshaw brings Les Dawson alive in the most joyous fashion in a one man show – Les Dawson Flying High. He looks like him and sounds like him as he delivers the writing of Tim Whitnall, with aplomb!

Audiences can enjoy watching as “Les Dawson” contemplates and looks back at his life. There is a giant tv screen where, for a short while, it is moving to see Les Dawson watch himself and his creations Cissie and Ada, which he performed with the late Roy Barraclough (who later appeared in the likes of Coronation Street).

It’s fascinating to be whisked into his world, from childhood up to when he became famous and starred in many tv shows, such as Blankety Blank, The Les Dawson Show and so many more…There are jokes galore that had the audience I was in, laughing a lot. There is of course music and songs, a couple which have the words up for audience participation. There are some parts that are a bit more somber and moving. Every inch of this performance also seemed heartfelt.
I’m too young to have been in any audience of Les Dawson’s, but this is how it may well have been for people who were and every second of it brought much laughter, many smiles and that joyous feeling, the signing off with an appeal for kindness, which is as relevant today as it ever was back in Les Dawson’s day and indeed that’s what he wanted the world to have – kindness.
The play felt completely respectful to the late Les Dawson and there are all the aspects that I had expected and indeed any audience would and for newcomers to his comedy and indeed the talented and well-executed impressions of Jon Culshaw, they are in for a treat! Book Here

As I’ve said, I was too young to see Les Dawson on stage, let alone know who he properly was at the time of his death, although at that time, I was starting to realise, just a bit that he filled people’s living rooms and theatres and was in a lot of people’s hearts. I later got introduced to his comedy on tv because my parents had got me to watch it and before long, I grew to enjoy and appreciate it and the talent and skill that he has. I’ve read articles wondering what younger folk who weren’t around in the height of his fame or too young to be watching his shows made of this. Well, I highly recommend it for all adults. This is one to have in your Edinburgh Fringe schedule. Book Here

#EdFringe #Review by Lou. of Boorish Trumpson Performed By ClaireLPParry #BoorishTrumpson #comedy #music #physicalcomedy #MakeMusicGreatAgain ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Today I have a review from the Edinburgh Fringe Festival of Boorish Trumpson. I didn’t know what to expect, well, not entirely, except music and the words of it just being a rehearsal. A rehearsal for what, you may well ask. This is a one woman show performed by Claire Parry in one of the Assembly Rooms venues at the Fringe Festival. Suitable for ages 8 plus.  Booking link is below. First, meet Claire, at least in photo form, whom I thank for this as I saw her as I was leaving the venue, then onto my review.

Claire Parry describes herself on social media as a clown, musician, theatre-maker, writer and cartwheeled. In her physical, audience participation play, she takes on the role of a conductor for a very special occasion. Boorish Trumpson loves music, but you can see some past traumas momentarily get in her way, bringing what is a very funny, fast paced and energised play some hidden depth and back story. There is much to laugh about and much to participate in. There is lots of music that will be recognisable to the masses. She needs an orchestra. This is no ordinary orchestra. This has rhythms and beats very cleverly curated and created using many methods in this comedy.

There are, as you may have noticed with the title, certain political themes running through this musical performance, including certain traits, which as you’ll see in the photo, runs into appearance. The show is ultimately hilarious and Parry engages every single audience member with this show.

For something incredibly unique and a whole lot of fun, try this show for size. Book Here

#TheatreReview By Lou of The Dresser By Ronald Harwood Directed By Terry Johnson @captheatres #Terry Johnson #MatthewKelly #SamualHolmes #Review

The Dresser
By Ronald Harwood
Directed by Terry Johnson
Rated: 5 stars

I went to see The Dresser at The King’s Theatre in Edinburgh (Capital Theatres) on Saturday. It was packed of theatre-goers and no wonder. The cast and play was superb in this memorable, not going to leave you play. Ever since I saw the film version of The Dresser I had hoped it would be on stage. It, of course, with its subject matters, lends itself perfectly to actually being staged. This stage version is poignant, mesmorising, sad, funny and acted amazingly. Find out more about it below, including the rest of my no spoilers review.

The Dresser

The Cast

Matthew Kelly as Sir
Samual Holmes as The Dresser (understudy for Julian Clary for the day I saw this)
Emma Amos as Her Ladyship
Rebecca Charles as Madge
Natalie Servat as Irene
Pip Donaghy as Geoffrey
Robert Shaw Cameron as Kent
Peter Yapp as Gloucester
Stephen Cavanagh as Albany
Claire Jester and Michaela Bennison as the ensemble

Inspired by memories of working as Donald Wolfit’s dresser as a young man, Ronald Harwood’s evocative, affectionate and hilarious portrait of backstage life is one of the most acclaimed dramas of modern theatre.

Olivier award-winner, Matthew Kelly stars as an ageing actor-manager, known to his loyal acting company as ‘Sir’, who is struggling to cling on to his sanity and complete his two hundred and twenty seventh performance of King Lear.

Julian Clary (replaced by Samual Holmes due to illness for the day I saw this), stars as Norman, Sir’s devoted dresser who ensures that in spite of everything, the show goes on.  For sixteen years Norman has been there to fix Sir’s wig, massage his ego, remind him of his opening lines and provide the sound effects in the storm scene.

Review

The Dresser takes place behind the scenes of the theatre during the war. The parts the general audience do not see. The portrayal is pretty accurate, there are attitudes, egos, tenderness and confidences. These and the memory loss (on-set dementia), was also portrayed perfectly by Matthew Kelly. The play gives great insight to behind the scenes moments into the life of a dresser and the relationship between the dresser and the actor.

The play has great poignancy and sadness, with some humour for those who perhaps recognise what is really going on and lived through such moments.

Matthew Kelly as Sir (the principle actor) plays lots of Shakespearan characters, that’s what he is known for. The decline in health is evident as he tries to remember his lines for King Lear and the frustration shows. His dresser, played by Samual Holmes had to take a lot of the flack, but the intensity of the relationship was evident. After seeing Matthew Kelly in The Habit of Art online as Covid and lockdowns struck in 2020, I was looking forward to seeing him in-person on stage and he was every bit as excellent as I thought he would be, even with a very different part.
Matthew Kelly and Samual Holmes in The Dresser were evenly matched and so charasmatic and both played their parts with aplomb!

This has now finished in Edinburgh, but if you ever get a chance to see this amazing play, I highly recommend it. This is a play I would happily see again and the company was fabulous!

Capital Theatres