Article of Rodham – Featuring the fabulous -Awfully Opinionated For A Girl totebag @csittenfeld @penguinrandom #Rodham #RandomThingsTours #Photographs #Totebag #Fiction #NewRelease

“Awfully Opinionated For A Girl”

Article of a Totebag and Review of Rodham

After reviewing the briliant new book – Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld, published by Penguin Random House, they decided to gift an absolutely fabulous tote bag, which I thank very, very much. It is such a wonderful and generous gift. I am incredibly pleased with the tote bag and have already used it. I absolutely Love it! It’s a sturdy canvas bag, that is also a very practical, decent size. The quote “Awfully Opinionated For A Girl”, printed on the bag is fabulous.
Thanks to my friend, Vikki Deacon, who was willing to take photos of me. modelling the bag, after my idea, that it would be fun to do a photoshoot and a good way of showing off this wonderful bag.
Once I worked out poses and we discussed locations, the fun was on…
We have a few pics and a small slideshow at the bottom too. A link to the review I published on the book  – Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld can be found below the mosaic of pics. I absolutely recommend this wonderfully fascinating, all captivating book.
We had fun and we hope that you do too.

Rodham Crouching

What I love most about the bag is the quote:

“Awfully
Opinionated
For A Girl”.

Put it this way,
I shown my mother and she smiled and said “oh yes, that’s made for you.” My friend who socially distanced took the photos, happened to agree. The thing is, those who know me, know I have opinions on most things. Lots of opnions. I keep telling my mother it’s the way she brought my brother and I up, to be able to form opinions and to just be generally independent.

Off we went, socially distanced, to a cycle path, that used to be a railway, since I have strong opinons on transport and also walk along this path.

Rodham at bridge

Since I have opinons on trees and have a love of them, we  rambled onto nearby woodland.

Rodham Looking At Sky

Just a few more pics and the review link is below…

Rodham Amongst Trees Rodham at tunnel  Rodham In Bush     Rodham Crouching

 

Rodham CoverRodham by Curtis Sittenfeld is Available Now!

Click the link to my Review

Thanks again for having me on the blog tour and for the totebag. It all made my day!

rodham Curtis Sittenfeld Author Pic

Article on Rodham – Featuring “Awfully Opinionated For A Girl” Totebag @csittenfeld @penguinrandom #Rodham #RandomThingsTours #Photographs #Totebag #Fiction #NewRelease

“Awfully Opinionated For A Girl”

Article of a Totebag and Review of Rodham

After reviewing the briliant new book – Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld, published by Penguin Random House, they decided to gift an absolutely fabulous tote bag, which I thank very, very much. It is such a wonderful and generous gift. I am incredibly pleased with the tote bag and have already used it. I absolutely Love it! It’s a sturdy canvas bag, that is also a very practical, decent size. The quote “Awfully Opinionated For A Girl”, printed on the bag is fabulous.
Thanks to my friend, Vikki Deacon, who was willing to take photos of me. modelling the bag, after my idea, that it would be fun to do a photoshoot and a good way of showing off this wonderful bag.
Once I worked out poses and we discussed locations, the fun was on…
We have a few pics and a small slideshow at the bottom too. A link to the review I published on the book  – Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld can be found below the mosaic of pics. I absolutely recommend this wonderfully fascinating, all captivating book.
We had fun and we hope that you do too.

 Rodham Crouching

What I love most about the bag is the quote:

“Awfully
Opinionated
For A Girl”.

Put it this way,
I shown my mother and she smiled and said “oh yes, that’s made for you.” My friend who socially distanced took the photos, happened to agree. The thing is, those who know me, know I have opinions on most things. Lots of opnions. I keep telling my mother it’s the way she brought my brother and I up, to be able to form opinions and to just be generally independent.

Off we went, socially distanced, to a cycle path, that used to be a railway, since I have strong opinons on transport and also walk along this path.

Rodham at bridge

Since I have opinons on trees and have a love of them, we  rambled onto nearby woodland.

Rodham Looking At Sky

Check out the pics and discover the review link below.

Rodham Cover

Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld is Available Now!

Click the link to my Review

Thanks again for having me on the blog tour and for the totebag. It all made my day!

rodham Curtis Sittenfeld Author Pic

Rodham – Awfully Opinionated For A Girl @csittenfeld @penguinrandom #Rodham #RandomThingsTours #Photographs #Totebag #Fiction #NewRelease

“Awfully Opinionated For A Girl”

Article of a Totebag and Review of Rodham

After reviewing the briliant new book – Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld, published by Penguin Random House, they decided to gift an absolutely fabulous tote bag, which I thank very, very much. It is such a wonderful and generous gift. I am incredibly pleased with the tote bag and have already used it. I absolutely Love it! It’s a sturdy canvas bag, that is also a very practical, decent size. The quote “Awfully Opinionated For A Girl”, printed on the bag is fabulous.
Thanks to my friend, Vikki Deacon, who was willing to take photos of me. modelling the bag, after my idea, that it would be fun to do a photoshoot and a good way of showing off this wonderful bag.
Once I worked out poses and we discussed locations, the fun was on…

We have a few pics and a small slideshow at the bottom too. A link to the review I published on the book  – Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld can be found below the slideshow. I absolutely recommend this wonderfully fascinating, all captivating book.
We had fun and we hope that you do too.

 Rodham Crouching

 

 

What I love most about the bag is the quote:

“Awfully
Opinionated
For A Girl”.

 

 

 

Put it this way,
I shown my mother and she smiled and said “oh yes, that’s made for you.” My friend who socially distanced took the photos, happened to agree. The thing is, those who know me, know I have opinions on most things. Lots of opnions. I keep telling my mother it’s the way she brought my brother and I up, to be able to form opinions and to just be generally independent.

Off we went, socially distanced, to a cycle path, that used to be a railway, since I have strong opinons on transport and also walk along this path.

Rodham at bridge

 

Since I have opinons on trees and have a love of them, we  rambled onto nearby woodland.

Rodham Looking At Sky

 

Check out the short slide show below. There are arrows to also click forwards and backwards.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Rodham Cover

 

 

Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld is Available Now!

Click the link to my Review

Thanks again for having me on the blog tour and for the totebag. It all made my day!

rodham Curtis Sittenfeld Author Pic

 

#Review of Rodham by @csittenfeld @penguinrandom @RandomTTours #BlogTour #Rodham

Rodham
By Curtis Sittenfeld
Rated:  4 star****

This book and the angle it was taking had grabbed my attention, I think the themes throughout it will grab many other people’s attention too. I’d like to thank Anne Cater at Random Things Tours for inviting me and to Izzie at Penguin Random House for supplying me with an e-copy of the book. The hardback is available from 9th July.

About the Author:

In addition to Rodham, Curtis Sittenfeld is the author of the Sunday Times bestseller rodham Curtis Sittenfeld Author PicAmerican Wife, in which she painted a picture of an ordinary American girl – a thinly disguised Laura Bush – who found herself married to a President. It was longlisted for the Orange Prize, as was her debut novel Prep. Her other books are Man of My Dreams, Sisterland (a Richard & Judy Book Club pick), Eligible, and the acclaimed short story collection You Think It, I’ll Say It.
Her books are translated into 30 languages.
She lives with her family in the American Mid-West.

Blurb

‘Awfully opinionated for a girl’ is what they call Hillary as she grows up in her Chicago suburb. Smart, diligent, and a bit plain, that’s the general consensus.Then Hillary goes to college, and her star rises. At Yale Law School, she continues to be a leader— and catches the eye of driven, handsome and charismatic Bill. But when he asks her to marry him, Hillary gives him a firm ‘No’.
The rest, as they say, isn’t history. How might things have turned out for them, for America, for the world itself, if Hillary Rodham had really turned down Bill Clinton?
With her sharp but always compassionate eye, Sittenfeld explores the loneliness, moral ambivalence and iron determination that characterise the quest for high office, as well as the painful compromises demanded of female ambition in a world ruled by men. Uncannily astute and witty in the telling, RODHAM is a brilliant reimagining – an unmissable literary landmark and truly a novel of ourtimes.

“This book is a bombshell… Sittenfeld writes women better than anybody else” Bryan Appleyard, SUNDAY TIMES
“This addictive novel is the Sliding Doors of American politics. Gripping” STYLIST
“A wonderful, sad dream of what might have happened” Anne Enright, GUARDIAN
“Hugely enjoyable… a delight” OBSERVER, Book of the Week

Rodham Cover

Review

What might have happened if life events for Hillary Rodham, nee Clinton were different? It’s a thought and one that Curtis Sittenfeld has had and wrote about her vision. One thing that went through my mind was what Hillary and Bill thought of it…

Set in the 1970’s at Yale Law School, Hillary Rodham is trying to decide how she should style herself, what hair-do to have etc and she has some feistyness about her. It’s where she meets Bill Clinton. This is a book that tells a story about the Clintons in their younger years. It’s a re-imagining of Hillary Rodham Clinton.
The novel reads very well. It’s not at all as heavy going as you might expect. This is most definitely a plus point. Is it odd reading a re-imagining of someone’s life? To be truthful, a bit, but all the same, this is better than what I thought it was going to be. I had gotten somewhat intrigued by it when I was invited on the blog tour and intrigue soon turned into a kind of enjoyment.

There’s already ambition in Bill to become President from near the start. It’s a bit of a love story with that first look of young lust and youthfulness. It is all rather fun and reads with a certain ease in the air. The romance throughout this part is intense and well-written.

There’s an interesting thing that happens on a bus, which demonstrates different races living in different areas and not really living like a few whites and a few Mexicans etc in the same area as each other (not that I’m getting into politics, it’s just a part that really stood out for me).

There’s some light humour in the first part of the book. I like the tone how it shows a lighter side to life and also a deeper side, such as when Hillary is looking into cases, that are a definite contrast to the rich and wealthy at Yale to those who are scraping by and those with medical conditions and more…

Readers are later taken to 1991. Politics is tense, Bush is around and Bill Clinton wants to take Professor Rodham (Hillary) with him to campaign for presidency. Bill and Hillary’s earlier romance had broken off as Bill went off with another woman. There’s some emotion, I don’t mean sad emotion there, more matter-of-fact in a way. It’s written well, it isn’t harsh or anything like that, it’s saying how it is.

Time moves forward further and there is an interesting list of president and vice-presidents. There is also a taste of the atmosphere around rallies and also some of the bigger issues being questioned that were on-topic at the time, such as Aids. Although this is a re-imagining, there is some reality throughout it, about what was going on and what people were caring about most at the time. The author has also show some of Hillary’s connections with charities and, as with the majority of the book, it demonstrates this human connection. The author is certainly trying to paint Hillary Clinton as she became in as positive light as possible. As time moves onwards to the millenium years, there’s tension that mounts and can be felt in the writing. The writer also goes into Hillary dropping out of the rallies early (Barack Obama then succeeded and went all the way to being President). The relationship with Bill and how she now views Bill (remember this is a reimagining) is an interesting way of looking at things. The book goes right up to practically the present and Donald Trump and what he says about Hillary Rodham.

The conclusion is strong and is actually quite profound. If you enjoy some romance, a reimagining of a life-story and a bit of interest in American politics, or even romance (there’s plenty of it), then this, I recommend for you. It is well-told and got strong writing.

Rodham BT Poster

 

Georgina by David Munro – set in Crete around world war two #Georgina #DavidMunro #Greece #SecondWorldWar #Fiction #Review

 

Georgina
By David Munro
Rated:4 stars ****

It is with thanks to David Munro for getting in touch with me via my blog to enquire about reviewing his book.

Portrait DMDavid Munro was born in Edinburgh and lived there until the age of 27.  He was employed by a major brewery within the capital and relocated to Aberdeen, then Glasgow.  David attended university and college to attain Chartered Marketer status. As an arts professional and with experience of different cultures, this lends itself to creative literature.

David’s love of history allows him the opportunity to delve into past cultures and pinnacle events. His latest novel, Georgina, has a Second World War theme, telling a story of heartache, romance and espionage.

As a writer, David’s ambition is to give his readers enjoyment through interesting stories with compelling characters. Georgina has one male and two female characters that readers will embrace. To achieve recognition in the form of a best-seller is a goal.

Blurb

Hollywood, 1930. Georgina, a personable fun-loving woman, sits alone with another large glass of wine for company. She has discovered that her actor partner has gambled away their mansion and is dating a young actress. To compound matters, Georgina is under suspicion for her husband’s murder a year earlier.

Georgina leaves America for the sanctuary of far-away Crete. With a new identity, she finds work as a teacher of music. Soon, she shares a property with Elena, a beautiful raven-haired socialite who has powerful, but dubious companions.

When invaded by the Germans, Crete is thrown into turmoil. Their soldiers begin a brutal occupation of the island and hardship ensues. By chance, Georgina meets a German officer and an unlikely romance blossoms. Because of her association with Erich Hoeness, she is suspected of being a spy.

Erich is a loyal soldier, but also has a conscience. He starts to siphon German food supplies to ease some islander’s starvation. However, given German atrocities on Crete, will this compassion save him and Georgina from savage retribution?

Georgina

Review

The cover is smart and evocative and is interesting with its light and shadowing.

 I like the way Eddie and Georgina are instantly introduced, there’s instant imagery and a feel for them. Georgina sits miserable, after the first 6 months with the very handsome Eddie being so happy. The year is 1931, LA and she fears her past could be reoccurring, just with a different set of people. She seems to have it all, a mansion, the guy, but all isn’t well at all as Eddie could be cheating on her with an actress. 1931 and things are changing in Hollywood, technology has come in that means talkies are on the way in and silent film is on its way out.

The way Marco Bellini is first introduced just over the phone and the shiftyness around his name adds curiosity about this now seemingly sinister character as well as the money troubles and Americans are still feeling the effects of the Wall Street Crash. It’s an interesting novel and the excitement of the newspapers announcing gambling being legalised and the Empire State Building going to open up comes across well in the writing.

Eddie is found to be not well after being involved in a crash and everything changes after his death. She finds herself in a police station being questioned and accused of killing him, either herself or contracted someone to do it for her. It adds to the intrigue.

Georgina is from Scotland, but moved to America and then starts over again in Heraklion, Crete. The words flow well as she travels by boat and there’s more to be learnt about Georgina. That time for the travelling and the getting to know characters is creatively used.

The positioning in politics and changing culture for Crete is fascinating and also told well. This isn’t a heavy read, which is good. It gently informs within conversations with Elena as the story moves along. I like this way of doing it a lot.

Georgina is introduced to Stelios Balaskas, who teaches at a school and is in a relationship with Georgina. This could perhaps have been written a bit more to allow development for the lead-up. What happens after is stronger writing.

The outbreak of war and the opinions that the characters are given is very readable and I get the feeling that good, solid research has been done and what impresses, is the natural flow of conversations from the characters. It’s interesting reading about the war from the point of view of people living within a different country to that of the UK and there’s a great sense of looking into a different country ie the UK from an outsider – Crete and what is seen as well as what is happening within Crete. It’s like a very grown-up, matter-of-fact conversation that just flows easily from page to page. The connections between what was happening between Greece, Turkey and Italy is fascinating.
The weaving of fact and fiction during the times in Crete is exceptional! It could have been heavy and sluggish, but instead it has a natural flow and is interesting and moves onwards at a decent pace and is intelligently written.

Georgina then meets Captain Hoeness and things get ever more serious and tight as the forces, deployed in Stalingrad are surrounded by the Red Army and then there’s the issue of what Italy may do. It’s all rather gripping as it goes on and there’s also an abduction plan… you’ll need to read on to discover if fears of removing someone from power leaves a vacuum or not.

With there being a prisoner of war trying to escape, concentration camps, the Red Army; the author has clearly put in a lot of work to research what was happening within many countries. There’s great detail of what happened to prisoners when Germany and their allies started to lose their grip and in what started to happen after the end of the war and it emerges even more that not everyone is who they once appeared to be. There is also what happened next when civil war broke out and the fear of both Germany on the far right and Russia on the far left and what they may do with Greece and Crete. There is intrigue as to if Erich has committed war crimes or not. The interest continues to the end in what is a fascinating book.
I recommend Georgina and I would think people who enjoy espionage and war stories or books set around Greece would enjoy this one.
If you enjoy Victoria Hislop’s books then give Georgina a try.

#Review of the very funny book – The Miseducation of Evie Epworth by Matson Taylor 5* @matson_taylor_ @ScribnerBooks #TheMiseducationOfEvieEpworth #RandomThingsTours #BlogTour #Fiction #Newbook

The Miseducation of Evie Epworth
By Matson Taylor
Rated: 5 stars *****

Written by Louise Cannon (Lou)

Today I am delighted and excited to present to you my review of the heartwarming and funniest book I’ve read in ages – The Miseducation of Evie Epworth. It’s a book I highly recommend. Find out more about the author, the book and my review below.

About the Author

Matson Taylor Author PicMatson Taylor grew up in Yorkshire but now lives in London. He is a design historian and academicwriting tutor and has worked at various universities and museums around the world; he currently teaches at the V&A, Imperial College, and the RCA. He has also worked on Camden Market, appeared in an Italian TV commercial, and been a pronunciation coach for Catalan opera singers.

 

Miseducation of Evie Epworth Cover

Blurb

Cold Comfort Farm meets Adrian Mole in the funniest debut novel of the year.
Yorkshire, the summer of 1962. Sixteen year-old Evie Epworth stands on the cusp of womanhood. But what kind of a woman will she become?
Up until now, Evie’s life has been nothing special: a patchwork of school, Girl Guides, cows, milk deliveries, lost mothers and village fetes. But, inspired by her idols (Charlotte Bronte, Shirley MacLaine and the Queen), she dreams of a world far away from rural East Yorkshire, a world of glamour lived under the bright lights of London (or Leeds).
Standing in the way of these dreams, though, is Christine, Evie’s soon to be stepmother, a manipulative and money grubbing schemer who is lining Evie up for a life of shampoo and-set drudgery at the local salon. Luckily, Evie is not alone. With the help of a few friends, and the wise counsel of the two Adam Faith posters on her bedroom wall (‘brooding Adam’ and ‘sophisticated Adam’), Evie comes up with a plan to rescue her bereaved father, Arthur, from Christine’s pink and over-perfumed clutches, and save their beloved farmhouse from being sold off. She will need a little luck, a dash of charm and a big dollop of Yorkshire magic if she is to succeed, but in the process she may just discover who exactly she is meant to be.

Mideducation Evie Graphic

Review

I love this book from the very first page. It is full of so much good humour. Humour, like writing and even my review, is subjective, but it takes skill to get humour down on a page well. Matson Taylor does this very well. What I really like is that it isn’t too silly and yet it is laugh out loud humour. It’s a hearwarming, cheery book with artistic placement of some words, which I enjoyed.

The pages are filled with so much energy, fun. Evie is 16 1/2, milk delivering teenager in 1960s, East of Yorkshire and is full of life. She also has an MG, her dad’s car that is, which she crashed, but is still good humoured. Evie loves the celebrities like Grace Kelly, who she tries to emulate in fashion, but her favourites are Adam Faith (who she wrote 3 times to and sadly he didn’t have the decency to write back. So sad), Shirley MacLaine and Charlotte Bronte. Then there’s The Queen, who she also idolises. She also seems to like Norse mythology and having fun with them. Who she doesn’t like too much and can be a bit scathing of is Christine, her soon to be step-mother and for good reason.

The book is set in Yorkshire. An area of the country I have explored some of and have loved. Evie’s dad has booked a trip to York to visit York Castle Museum ( which I recommend. It’s a place I’ve been to a few times and it never disappoints with its olde streets and ye olde shops inside it and fashions and more) and  Betty’s Tearooms (which I recommend you visit. It has a list of teas as long as your arm, perhaps longer and lovely cakes).

In her head she thinks about jobs she might do and can’t decide, but really all she wants is to be an assistant to Adam Faith. Evie is a character you would want to get to know. If she wasn’t a character in a book, you’d want to be friends with her. Her imagination is fabulously fun and pretty accurate for a creative, daydreaming, book reading 16 1/2 year old…

There are some philosophical musings around here and there about life.

The other people readers meet via Evie are amusing in the way that she sees them. There is however a kindness about her too. She has an interest in people who she can actually meet too, such as Mr and Mrs Scott-Pym and how Mr Pym was involved in the Spanish Civil War and was a journalist and realises she knows very little about them. It’s a thought isn’t it? How much do we really know the people in our neighbourhood? Evie learns a lot from her about her family. It’s an emotional tale. The emotions of cheerfulness and sadness are skillfully written by Matson Taylor.

There are sections of just a couple of pages or so called “Interludes” throughout the book, which is an original way of telling other character’s stories. They give little insights of life of Arthur and Mrs Scott-Pym before the 1960s. It works very well because readers then get to see Arthur before having a child and when he met his first wife, Diana. It’s tenderly written. It gives insight into Rosamund Scott-Pym’s life when Caroline, her daughter, was younger, which is interesting.

There’s a triple celebration and what better than to celebrate with cake. Not just any cake though, it may contain some Yorkshire magic and a real need for Christine to eat some, to the point I was hoping she would take a bite. I found myself very firmly on Evie’s side early on.

The village fete is full of fun, cakes and cattle. Matson Taylor pulls off a joyful atmosphere very well.

Evie’s first day of work in a hairdressing salon is when the real world really hits home, it’s funny between her client and herself as there’s plans of subterfuge. Find out what else happens in this amazingly funny book that I highly recommend and if Evie leaves home for London or Leeds. 

FINAL Miseducation Evie Epworth BT Poster